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The MAP News, 261st Ed., 16 April 2011

{PARA}
Dear Friends,
This is the 261th Edition of the Mangrove Action Project News, April 16, 2011.

For the Mangroves,
Alfredo Quarto
Mangrove Action Project

MAP’s Mission

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

DONATE TO MAP

MAP depends on your support in order to produce this e-bulletin and all that we do. Please visit our website and consider donating to MAP today. It is easy to give a one-time donation, or to set up monthly recurring donations via PayPal or Network for Good!

SHRIMP LESS, THINK MORE campaign has changed it’s name to QUESTION YOUR SHRIMP:

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog.
Join MAP on Facebook
Sign the Consumer’s Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

Action Alerts:

A fun and exciting Art Contest for children 6 to 14 years old
We invite all primary school children from tropical and sub-tropical nations, and whose schools are located near mangroves, to create art telling us “why mangroves are important to me and my community”. Selected winners will be published in a 2012 calendar to be distributed internationally to raise awareness of mangrove forest ecology. READ MORE

SUPPORT BANGLADESH – STOP THE MINE! Stand with the people of Bangladesh in opposing a mega-mine that would force them from their homes and destroy their lives and environment. Please join our global call by Signing The Petition

Support MAP through purchase of Kennedy Warne’s new book “Let Them Eat Shrimp.”
Order through MAP and you will get a 20% discount on your purchase of the new book by author Kennedy Warne, “Let Them Eat Shrimp.” Part of your purchase price will go to MAP, where we will use a portion of your purchase to help with MAP’s general support. In this way Kennedy’s new book on mangroves and shrimp farming will make great reading while also helping support the ongoing work of MAP to conserve and restore mangroves, while addressing those main issues affecting mangroves. Please let us know if you would like to order one or more copies of this book. EMAIL MAP

Volunteer Needed For MAP
1. MAP/Asia Coordinator requires office assistance to support a wide range of projects activities.
VIEW JOB DESCRIPTION
2. HELP WANTED – Interns and/ or Volunteers veeded to Help MAP with Marketing and Advertising. Learn More
3. Translators needed
Spanish and French translators urgently needed to help translate short articles into English for our MAP News! Please write to [email protected], or call 360-452-5866 to volunteer your services.

World Atlas of Mangroves donates 10% of purchase price to Mangrove Action Project LEARN MORE

MAP ISSUES

ISME’s Newsletter recently released CLICK HERE

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO

FEATURED SECTION

Energy at What Cost? Protests Against Forced Eviction from US-Backed Coal Mine Continue in Bangladesh
040811-4BANGLADESH – As the sun rose on March 28, 2011, roughly 2,000 people gathered to demonstrate against a mining project that would displace tens of thousands of people in northwest Bangladeshand establish one of the largest open pit coal mines in the world. Located in an agricultural region that is home to thousands of farming and indigenous families, the Phulbari Coal Project has been fiercely opposed by Bangladeshi citizens for over six years. Regardless, the UK-based company pursuing the project, Global Coal Management Resources, or GCM (formerly the Asia Energy Corporation), is expressing confidence that the mine will go forward. READ MORE

AFRICA

Ballabu Conservation Project in Focus
GAMBIA- Ballabu Conservation Project is a community-based Organization in Partnership with Eden Project in the United Kingdom. The project has strived to established a 100% community owned and operated conservation project which enables over 100,000 rural people, opportunity to health cCare, education, water resources, employment, and development to rural Africa. Ballabu Conservation Project started in 2004 through the efforts of James English and his business partner Lawrence Williams, the founders of MakasutuCultureForestto create an atmosphere that would generate something valuable to the people living in the rural area. English revealed that rural tours will be established to take tourist to the 14 participating villages, highlighting the plight of traditional African village life and the impact of a swelling population on the environment. The tour will enlighten the tourist by explaining the benefits of sustainable/eco tourism from a scientific point of view, and also the reasons why this particular region of The Gambia can benefit from this intended project not just in financial sense, but also in the protection of the mangroves, forest and wild life of the area. READ MORE

ASIA

Using Soybean In Aquaculture Feeds
CHINA – A market for over six million metric tons of soybean meal has been successfully created over the past 15 years through the development, field testing, and demonstration of all-plant protein, soymeal-based feeds to fish farmers in China, says Dr Michael Cremer, from the American Soybean Association. Opening this market to alternative feeds has helped boost China’s freshwater aquaculture production from less than five million metric tons to more than 20 million metric tons (5.5 to 22.0 million US tons) by alleviating the necessity for traditional animal protein sources, such as fish meal, in most freshwater fish diets. In the process, it has helped the Chinese aquaculture industry advance from traditional manure-fertilized to modern, feed-based production of the majority of carp, tilapia, catfish and other freshwater fish species farmed in China. This new approach to feed has provided domestic and international consumers with ready access to higher quality farmed seafood from Chinaat reasonable prices, while providing a growing market for US grown soybean products. READ MORE

Editor’s note: see our LAST WORDat the end of this email for more on this story from one of our readers.

Update:Sea turtle and their habitat conservation in Orissa
INDIA – Over the years, APOWA (Action for Protection of Wild Animals) has been working for the conservation of endangered Olive Ridley sea turtles and their habitat in Orissa coast. With our sustained campaign, commitment and combined strongly with field protection, networking with fishermen communities, comprehensive innovative awareness campaigns, the result has been advantageous. They are umbrella species (protecting the important umbrella species and preserving their habitat helps to protect a number of other species that depend on the same habitat). In March first week this year, the spectacular mass-nesting of the endangered Olive Ridley sea turtles have commenced at Gahirmatha and Rushikullya sea turtle rookery in Orissa; the sporadic nesting, which had begun one month earlier in unprotected adjacent beaches, went almost unnoticed. The endangered species which comes en-masse to these places, rarely turn up in such large numbers anywhere in the planet. In recent years regular ‘arribada’ beaches have fortunately received a lot of attention and protection, however the sporadic nesting sites are overlooked leaving the eggs and hatchlings susceptible to many dangers. We are focusing on non-protected areas and protect nesting turtles , as the majority of the nests get predated by feral animals and people . The sporadic nests contribute equally to that of arribada (mass nesting) of turtles hence it is highly required that sporadic nests are protected. READ MORE

Editor’s Note: In the mid-1990s, MAP had been involved in work to save the sea turtle nesting beaches of the Bhitarakanika region. We had at that time joined forces with the late, great environmental leader BankaBahery Das who directed the NGO Orissa Krushak Mahasangh. It is so encouraging to see that the NGO APOWA has taken this cause on to protect the sea turtles and coastal regions of this important area, involving in the process the local communities in a responsible and effective manner. We congratulate APOWA for its timely and important work there!

Substandard dam assessment opens way to fisheries destruction on Mekong
THAILAND – Disruptions to fish migration and food supplies for millions in the Mekongbasin are likely if the first mainstream dam on the lower Mekongis allowed to go ahead, WWF predicted as it released expert analysis showing the dam feasibility study and environmental impact assessment failed to address key environmental risks. The WWF commissioned review – coordinated by the WorldFish Centre with participation from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) found that the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the proposed Xayaburi dam in Laosand assessment were woefully inadequate and fell well below international standards for such studies. Xayaburi is the first of 11 dams proposed for the lower Mekongmainstem. Lower Mekongcountries are scheduled to decide on whether the dam project can move ahead on April 22. READ MORE

Editor’s Note: It must be acknowledged by those proposing to go ahead with this Xayaburi dam project that they are consciously willing to sacrifice the very life of the Mekong River and its Delta in the process. There is no way to keep the bountiful and important migratory fish species alive and well, if this project proceeds. It is also the death knell of the mangroves in the MekongDelta, as they require the river’s fresh waters and nutrients that this series of dams will greatly diminish. Those living both upstream and downstream will lose their fish, which are an essential part of their protein diets, and our planet will lose the once bountiful Mekong. This is just plain bad planning, and we sincerely hope the governments involved in making a decision will listen to reason and not to short-lived profit earnings.

EUROPE

Declining mangroves shield against global warming
ALeqM5i8mEMczazkeYzNoDES9_N28NsDYQFRANCE– Mangroves, which have declined by up to half over the last 50 years, are an important bulkhead against climate change, a study released this month has shown for the first time. Destruction of these tropical coastal woodlands accounts for about 10 percent of carbon dioxide emissions from deforestation, the second largest source of CO2 after fossil fuel combustion, the study found. Fewer trees not only mean less CO2 absorbed from the air, but also the release of carbon stocks that have been accumulating in shallow-water sediment over millennia. Mangroves — whose twisted, exposed roots grace coastlines in more than 100 countries — confer many benefits on humans living in their midst. READ MORE

World is losing battle against drug resistance, warns WHO
NETHERLANDS – A “post-antibiotic” era, in which many common infections no longer have a cure, is on the horizon, the WHO warned recently — as scientists reported the discovery of superbugs resistant to almost all known antibiotics in water supplies in New Delhi, India. “In the absence of urgent corrective and protective actions, the world is heading towards a post-antibiotic era, in which many common infections will … once again, kill unabated,” Margaret Chan, director-general of the WHO, said today, in an address to mark World Health Day, which this year is devoted to combating drug resistance. “We are at a critical point where antibiotic resistance is reaching unprecedented levels and new antibiotics are not going to arrive quickly enough,” said Zsuzsanna Jakab, the WHO’s regional director for Europe. “Until all countries tackle this, no country alone can be safe.” READ MORE

Editors Note: The following note was submitted to the online publication in rresponse to the above story:
Since 1992, we at Mangrove Action Project have been countering the rapid spread of the shrimp aquaculture industry in the global South. Often unregulated and ill-advised usage of a wide array of antibiotics takes place in the culture of farmed shrimp. Raised in densely stocked ponds, these shrimp often acquire different viruses that can multiply rapidly decimating whole coastal areas of their shrimp production in short time. To avoid these inevitable disease outbreaks and to ensure a harvest of marketable shrimp, most producers of shrimp in these still antiquated open, throughput systems of aquaculture use large amounts of antibiotics to quell the spread of disease. These antibiotics are used in the shrimp feed itself or directly applied within the water system of the pond, and the resultant effluents from these ponds enter the nearby waterways and marine waters where these accumulate and can create antibiotic resistant strains of “super bugs.” Many of these antibiotics used are closely related or are actually the same as those used in treating human diseases, thus opening that door to antibiotic resistance that this article now warns us about. We need to close these open systems of aquaculture, and ensure no antibiotics are used to avoid this kind of dangerous contamination and the further degrading of our limited tools to fend off serious human illnesses. That little shrimp raised in Indiaor Thailandor Hondurasmay have itself contributed to the concerns of disease resistant strains now seen as a growing threat to our entire world today! Such unwise use of antibiotics must be halted immediately.

NORTH AMERICA

MAP’s curriculum receives recognition
Students-in-ChinaMAP’s curriculum development and application program in Chinareceived a welcome boost last week when $25,000 was awarded by the Disney Friends for Change/Project Green towards the project. “We’d like to give a big thanks to all MAP’s friends and supporters for voting for the project,” says MAP’s Education Director, Martin Keeley. “The contribution will enable us to complete the translation and adaptation of our Teachers’ Guide into Mandarin, for it to be reviewed by environmental educators and specialists in Chinato ensure its accuracy, and for a workshop to be held in the fall for 50 to 60 teachers.” The workshop will be held in the southeastern City of Zhanjiangwhich is the central location of the country’s foremost and only government supported mangrove centre, the Zhanjiang National Mangrove Nature Reserve (ZNMNR). READ MORE

Declaration of Patihuitz: Divided We Become Allies of the Government
women_traditionalists_ah_langellewebMEXICO – Members of Global Justice Ecology Project traveled in late March to Chiapas, Mexico, to investigate the emerging local impacts of the REDD+ Program (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation), and specifically the REDD Agreement signed between Chiapas and California. What we found was an astonishingly complex web of economic development projects being imposed on campesino and indigenous communities without any semblance of free, prior, and informed consent. Among these projects is a government program to delimit Natural Protected Areas in order to generate carbon credits, and to pay some indigenous communities to protect these areas, to the detriment of others. As we’ve seen in other parts of the world, the REDD Program, in both intention and in operation, divides communities and breeds conflict. Our visit coincided with numerous events, including the inauguration of a “Sustainable Rural City” (apartheid housing for the displaced), a public protest by a community that had previously been evicted from the Montes Azules biosphere Reserve, and the first efforts at community education about REDD in the Lacandon region. READ MORE

Mangroves among the most carbon-rich forests in the tropics
USA- Deforestation and land-use change currently account for 8–20% of global anthropogenic carbon dioxide (co2) emissions, second only to fossil fuel combustion. Recent international climate agreements highlight reduced emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD+) as a key and relatively cost-effective option for mitigating climate change; the strategy aims to maintain terrestrial carbon stores through financial incentives for forest conservation (for example, carbon credits). REDD+ and similar programs require rigorous monitoring of c pools and emissions, underscoring the importance of robust storage estimates for various forest types, particularly those with a combination of high density and widespread land-use change. Tropical wetland forests (for example, peatlands) contain organic soils up to several metres deep and are among the largest organic reserves in the terrestrial biosphere. READ REPORT
Editor’s Note: We at MAP would like to urge our readers to review the referenced article on the importance of mangroves in sequestering and especially in below ground storage of carbon. The following excerpted points are especially relevant to MAP’s stance on mangroves since our founding in 1992: READ EDITORS COMMENTS

Invasive Plants Can Create Positive Ecological Change
110211095555USA- A team of scientists has discovered that human-introduced, invasive species of plants can have positive ecological effects. Tomás Carlo, an assistant professor of biology at PennStateUniversity, and Jason Gleditsch, a graduate student in the Department of Biology, have studied how invasive fruiting plants affect ecosystems and how those effects, contrary to prevailing ideas, sometimes can be beneficial to an ecological community. The team’s research, which will be published in the journal Diversity and Distributions, is expected to affect the way environmental resource managers respond to ecosystem maintenance. “Among conservation biologists, ecologists, and managers, the default approach is to try to eliminate and root out non-native, invasive shrubs — anything that seems to change an ecosystem,” Carlo said. “The fundamental goal is to return a natural area to its original, pristine state, with the native species occupying the dominant position in the community. But the problem is that most native communities already have been changed beyond recognition by humans, and many native species are now rare.” Carlo explained that his team wanted to test whether certain well-established, invasive fruiting species have negative or positive effects on bird and fruiting-plant communities. “We wondered: Are we sometimes doing more harm than good when we eradicate plants that, despite being introduced recently, have formed positive relationships with native animals?” To be considered invasive, a species of plant must have been introduced by humans, and it must be dominant numerically in the new environment.
READ MORE

RAE Leads Effort to Introduce Coastal Wetlands Restoration onto Carbon Markets
Restore America’s Estuaries (RAE) announced today that it will lead a landmark initiative to help coastal wetlands restoration and protection projects issue carbon credits on the international voluntary carbon market for the first time. RAE, a national advocacy organization dedicated to coastal and estuarine habitat restoration, will lead a technical working group that will develop requirements for quantifying and crediting the greenhouse gas benefits of several new types of wetlands conservation projects under the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) Program. “Coastal wetlands hold vast, untapped potential to trap atmospheric carbon, particularly carbon dioxide, one of the chief culprits behind global warming and climate change,” said Steve Emmett-Mattox, who will oversee the project as RAE’s Senior Director of Strategic Planning and Programs. READ MORE

Monsanto Modifies Soy beans To Grow ‘Fish Oil’
The biotechnology firm Monsanto stands just one FDA approval away from growing soybeans that have been genetically modified to produce those omega-3 fatty acids that doctors are always recommending. That FDA approval is expected this year, according to Science News. Monsanto is so despised by environmentalists that Google’s first suggested search term for the St. Louiscompany is “Monsanto evil.” Readers of Natural News voted Monsanto the world’s most evil corporation in a January poll, giving the corporation a whopping 51 percent of the vote. BP, by contrast, received 9 percent. But there may be reasons for even health-loving greens to love “stearidonic acid soybean oil,” as Monsanto’s new product is called. Among them: depleted fisheries, environmental toxins in fish oil, and a new threat, the scope of which has not yet been fully realized: millions of gallons of radioactive water dumped into the ocean at the Fukushima-Daichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. READ MORE

Degraded coastal wetlands contribute to climate change: report finds
USA – Drainage and degradation of coastal wetlands emit significant amounts of carbon dioxide directly to the atmosphere and lead to decreased carbon sequestration, a new World Bank report has found. The report, written in partnership with the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and wetland specialists ESA PWA, calls for coastal wetlands to be protected and incentives for avoiding their degradation and improving their restoration to be included into carbon emission reduction strategies and in climate negotiations. “For the first time we are getting a sense that greenhouse gas losses from drained and degraded coastal wetlands may be globally significant and that drained organic-rich soils continuously release carbon for decades,” says Stephen Crooks, Climate Change Services Director at ESA PWA – the consulting firm which looked at 15 coastal deltas worldwide for the report. “Emissions will increase with ongoing wetland losses.” READ MORE

SOUTH AMERICA

Mangrove Dynamics and Management in North Brazil
BRAZIL- A newly published book on mangroves in now available from Springer. This volume highlights the results of a ten-year German/ Brazilian research project, called MADAM, in one of the largest continuous mangrove areas of the world, located in northern Brazil. Based on the analysis of the ecosystem dynamics, management strategies for the conservation and sustainable use of mangroves are presented and discussed. Beyond the scientific results, this book also provides guidelines for the development of international cooperation projects. READ MORE

Bolivia enshrines natural world’s rights with equal status for Mother Earth
BOLIVIA – Bolivia is set to pass the world’s first laws granting all nature equal rights to humans. The Law of Mother Earth, now agreed by politicians and grassroots social groups, redefines the country’s rich mineral deposits as “blessings” and is expected to lead to radical new conservation and social measures to reduce pollution and control industry. The country, which has been pilloried by the USand Britainin the UN climate talks for demanding steep carbon emission cuts, will establish 11 new rights for nature. They include: the right to life and to exist; the right to continue vital cycles and processes free from human alteration; the right to pure water and clean air; the right to balance; the right not to be polluted; and the right to not have cellular structure modified or genetically altered. READ MORE

SOUTH PACIFIC

Biodiversity may clean up water
NEW ZEALAND – Conserving biodiversity could help shield waterways against nitrogen pollution, says a study that showed how streams with more species are better at removing excess nutrients from water. The findings imply that developing countries that keep rivers and lakes species-rich could save money on water treatment, Bradley Cardinale, author of the study and an aquatic ecologist from the University of Michigan, United States, told SciDev.Net. The study, published in Nature yesterday (7 April), is the first rigorous analysis of how biodiversity improves water quality, Cardinale said. Mopping up nitrogen compounds — a major cause of water pollution — released from agricultural fertilisers and waste, human sewage, and fossil fuel burning, is an important goal for environmental policy. Scientists have long known that ecosystems with more biodiversity are better at mopping up pollutants like nitrogen. But there was little experimental evidence for why this happens. A leading theory is that different species make maximum use of nutrients because they each fill a unique biological habitat — niche. READ MORE

LAST WORD

Aquaculture, Aquafeed & Soya
With aquaculture hailed as the future major provider of food fish, the aquafeed industry is also poised for a major growth. Reduction fisheries, the current major contributor of aquafeed industry being stamped as unsustainable, the focus is on plant-based aquafeed production, with soya as the front runner for aquafeeds. This switching to plant-based aquafeeds will also have repercussions on agriculture where there will be a push to bring more land under production of cash crops like soyabean, which though resource intensive is a better money earner than food grains. The crop is also very sensitive to weather conditions and in a year when the crop fails, it will have major impacts on the food security (directly and indirectly-through reduced purchasing power) of the rural poor. Another suggestion in the book “future of aquafeeds” is to reduce the waste of fish processing plants to make into aquafeeds. Though appears to be a good suggestion, it could also take away the remaining source of protein to the most impoverished in rural communities. A good example is the Lake Victoriafisheries famous for Nile Perch and its processing industries. While the fillet are exported to the rich food plates of Europe, the fish bones and heads, usually discarded, are used by the poorest in the community as a source of protein, vitamins and minerals. I have also witnessed this when I traveled among the through the poorest regions of West Bengalwhere the poorest of the community buy fish heads and fishbones for food. This will be easily taken away by the aquafeed processing units.

ADDITIONAL READING
Engineering the Blue Revolution
Using Soybean In Aquaculture Feeds

You can also get a copy of the “future of aquafeeds” from http://aquaculture.noaa.gov/pdf/feeds/aquafeedsrept_nov2010.pdf
Thank you & Best regards,
Neena K.

~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS

If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com
{/PARA}

The MAP News, 260th Ed., 02 April 2011

{PARA}
Dear Friends,
This is the 260th Edition of the Mangrove Action Project News, April 02, 2011.

For the Mangroves,
Alfredo Quarto
Mangrove Action Project

MAP’s Mission

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

DONATE TO MAP

MAP depends on your support in order to produce this e-bulletin and all that we do. Please visit our website and consider donating to MAP today. It is easy to give a one-time donation, or to set up monthly recurring donations via PayPal or Network for Good!

SHRIMP LESS, THINK MORE campaign has changed it’s name to QUESTION YOUR SHRIMP:

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog.
Join MAP on Facebook
Sign the Consumer’s Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

Action Alerts:

SUPPORT BANGLADESH – STOP THE MINE! Stand with the people of Bangladesh in opposing a mega-mine that would force them from their homes and destroy their lives and environment. Please join our global call by Signing The Petition

Volunteer Needed For MAP
1. MAP/Asia Coordinator requires office assistance to support a wide range of projects activities.
VIEW JOB DESCRIPTION
2. HELP WANTED – Interns and/ or Volunteers veeded to Help MAP with Marketing and Advertising. Learn More
3. Translators needed
Spanish and French translators urgently needed to help translate short articles into English for our MAP News! Please write to [email protected], or call 360-452-5866 to volunteer your services.

World Atlas of Mangroves donates 10% of purchase price to Mangrove Action Project LEARN MORE

Don’t Let Experimental Genetically Engineered Salmon Reach Your Plate
Take action to keep genetically engineered salmon out of the U.S. CLICK HERE

MAP ISSUES

Listen to the recent radio interview with Paula Palmer about the Phulbsari mine issues, as she mentions MAP as one of the opposing groups to this mine project. It is a good, informative interview.

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO

FEATURED SECTION

Coal Climate Showdown in Bangladesh
1200_bangladesh_1_460x230The bulldozers are warming up: any moment now a massively destructive coal mine could be approved in northwest Bangladesh that would displace tens of thousands of families, destroy vital farmland, and devastate mangrove forests that protect the climate-fragile country from rising sea levels. A movement of local protesters has stopped the mine once before, and this week they bravely blocked major roads in a desperate bid for the government’s attention. But the global consortium backing the mine has launched a massive lobbying effort to win, flying MPs to Europefor VIP coal tours. Wikileaks cables even show the USambassador lobbying for them. Now, the movement has appealed to our global network for solidarity — to raise a worldwide outcry to counter the international financiers and stop this mine. Prime Minister Hasina has spoken out against the mine, but she is under enormous pressure to approve it. Let’s build a massive petition urging the Prime Minister to side with her citizens and their environment by rejecting the devastating mine — local organisations will deliver it to the Prime Minister and consortium if we reach 300,000 signatures. Please sign the petition!

AFRICA

Palm oil giants target Africain ‘land grab’ following Indonesiadeforestation ban
182570Indonesia’s move to bring in a two-year moratorium on new palm oil plantations to protect its remaining rainforests has seen agribusiness giants like Sime Darby switch expansion plans to Cameroon, Ghanaand Liberia. The sudden upsurge in land deals by palm oil companies in Africacould lead to large-scale deforestation and loss of farmland by local communities, NGOs and environmental groups in Africahave told the Ecologist. The world’s largest palm oil producer Indonesiais due to implement a two-year ban on granting new concessions of land to plantation companies in forest areas. There are also restrictions on the availability of land in Malaysia. This has led companies like Sime Darby, which has more than half a million hectares of palm oil in Indonesiaand Malaysia, to look elsewhere. READ MORE

ASIA

Big Coal Emergency in Bangladesh
BANGLADESH – When thousands of Bangladeshi took to the streets again on March 28th as part of a decade-long battle to halt a devastating British-owned open-pit coal mine, the world not only watched whether Bangladesh’s government would honor a coal ban agreement from 2006 or resort to violence. In light of disturbing WikiLeaks cables, American and worldwide human rights and environmental organizations also questioned why the Obama administration is covertly pushing for Bangladesh to reverse course and acquiesce to an internationally condemned open-pit mine that will displace an estimated 100,000-200,000 villagers and ravage desperately needed farmland and water resources. READ MORE

Villagers rally against open pit mining
BANGLADESH – The national committee to protect oil, gas, mineral resources, ports and power on Monday enforced a six-hour road and rail blockade at Phulbari in Dinajpur, demanding implementation of its seven-point demands including compensation for Aman crops near Barapukuria coal mine area. At a meeting, the leaders of the committee demanded for withdrawal of cases that were filed on January 21 in the local police station against local people who obstructed a government move for conducting survey to assess the amount of damage due to coal extraction from Barapukuria coal mine. The oil-gas protection body has been spearheading a campaign against open pit mining and involvement of foreign companies in coal extraction and coal export. The committee has been demanding for ousting global coal management– the other name of Asiaenergy– from the country. READ MORE

FACEBOOK MEMBERS – View Photos of the march CLICK HERE

Severe flooding to reduce Thai shrimp output
Severe flooding in southern Thailandhas damaged shrimp farms and is expected to hurt frozen food production and exports, a leading industry official said, as authorities warned of more flooding in four provinces. “About 50,000 to 60,000 tonnes of shrimps were washed away by the flood. Damaged roads also obstruct transportation from farms,” Panisuan Jamnarmwej, president of the Thai Frozen Food Association, told Reuters. He said exports would be affected but it was too early to estimate by how much.
Thailand’s southern provinces produce about 70 percent of the country’s annual shrimp exports of 600,000 tonnes. The floods, which have forced railways to suspend services and cut off road and air transportation, have killed 25 people across four provinces. Seven other provinces were also affected. VIEW SOURCE

Pakistan Fishermen protest against anti-mangroves actions
INDIA- Hundreds of fishermen and women marched to protest against fast cutting of mangroves at Karachicoast. Lifting placards and banners inscribed with demands for protection of mangroves, people from different coastal areas marched through HawksBay, Mauripur Road. They were chanting slogans to press the government to protect the mangroves – a natural shield against sea calamities and primary hatchery to marine life falling over 129 km wide shoreline of the city. There is a firm belief of the fishermen communities that the logging of mangroves will expose the vast-populated city to disasters and cyclones, besides making its environment more polluted. Pakistan Fisherfolk Forum (PFF) organised a 2-day miles-long march of fishermen communities to highlight the significance of threat posed to mangroves. Representatives of citizens’ organisations, civil society groups and political activists also joined the protest march to express solidarity with the coastal communities. The protestors have staged a protest demonstration near Sandspit against land grabbers and mangroves cutters. Chairman PFF, Mohammed Ali Shah, General Secretary Saeed Baloch, Tahira Ali, Majeed Motani, Abdul Ghani, Sami Memon and others led the march. READ MORE

World Bank’s forest climate fund failing to protect forests
VIETNAM– A new report launched at the 8th meeting of the World Bank’s Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF) reveals that the Bank is not fulfilling its promises to protect the rights of forest peoples. Smoke and Mirrors: a critical assessment of the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility by Forest Peoples Programme (FPP) and FERN exposes the World Bank’s failure to uphold its commitments on human rights and its engagement in never-ending changes to its social and environmental policies, weakening its accountability to affected communities and the public. “The FCPF is backsliding on its social commitments, using a smokescreen of constantly changing standards and guidance notes that pay lip service to forest peoples’ rights, governance and benefit-sharing without clear binding rules that would hold the Bank and recipient governments accountable,” Francesco Martone, FPP policy advisor said. READ MORE

New Report Calculates Cost of International Climate Aid to Indonesian Economy and Jobs
INDONESIA – A new report released today in Jakarta concludes that international climate aid programs underway in Indonesia today intended to limit expansion of forest-related industries could cost the Indonesian economy 3.5 million jobs annually, reducing export revenues and hampering sustainable development initiatives according to NGO World Growth. According to World Growth, programs backed by international aid agencies like USAID and high-profile environmental groups such as Greenpeace and WWF will have a large negative impact on the Indonesian economy. “Greenpeace has been calling for a complete suspension of agriculture, mining and forest licenses in Indonesia,” said Alan Oxley, Chairman of the pro-growth NGO World Growth. “This would cost the Indonesian economy up to 3.5 million jobs annually, cut growth to industries that make up 15 per cent of the economy, and cut revenues to the Indonesian government, hampering its ability to sustainably manage Indonesia’s forest areas and continue poverty alleviation efforts.” READ MORE

EUROPE

World Migratory Bird Day 2011 Focuses on Land use changes from a bird’s eye view!
wmbd_2011_poster_webWe, the UNEP/AEWA and UNEP/CMS Secretariats, warmly invite you to take part in World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) 2011 which will be celebrated all over the world on 14 – 15 May this year. This year’s campaign will focus on “Land use changes from a bird’s-eye view”. By highlighting this theme, we want to raise awareness on the dramatic effects human land use has on migratory birds and the ecosystems upon which they depend. Please visit our newly launched WMBD 2011 website at: www.worldmigratorybirdday.org

NORTH AMERICA

Editor’s Note: It looks like Don has fired a first shot into the salmon aquaculture industry’s over-inflated expansion, and they are now reacting via their law suit against him and the newly formed GAAIA. We should be thinking of ways to help dilute the force of the attackers by widening their need to defend themselves from more sides than just Don’s whose brave stance is commendable, but should not stand alone! Let’s plan on gathering our combined forces to strike back at the Norwegian “empire” from our many different directions!

Staniford to Cermaq: ‘Bring it on!’
NAD0430535318CANADA- Don Staniford responded to Mainstream Canada’s announcement that it is suing the anti-farmed salmon activist and his organization, the Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture (GAAIA), for defaming the company’s fish-farming operations. “Bring it on!” said Staniford, the organization’s global coordinator, in a press release. In late January, Staniford and the newly formed GAAIA launched an international campaign against what it calls “Big Aquaculture.” The campaign, “Salmon Farming Kills,” employs similar graphic imagery to the “Smoking Kills” initiatives against Big Tobacco. It alleges that salmon aquaculture is harmful to both the environment and human health. Mainstream Canadais owned by Norway-based Cermaq, one of the world’s largest salmon producers. READ MORE

Blue Carbon: An Oceanic Opportunityto Fight Climate Change
blue-carbon_1USA- Stopping mangrove destruction could become an important element in confronting climate change. “Blue carbon is a source of emissions that hasn’t been addressed by the climate community and therefore creates an opportunity to reduce emissions,” says Roger Ullman, executive director of the Linden Trust for Conservation in New York City, which promotes the use of conservation finance and environmental markets. “These fabulous ecosystems…don’t cover a very large expanse of territory, yet still provide enormously important services to humanity and are being destroyed three or four times faster than the rate of tropical forests.” Case in point is California’s Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, explains Dan Laffoley, marine vice chairman of the World Commission on Protected Areas at the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. Over the last 100 years, 1,800 square kilometers of wetlands were drained, emitting two gigatons of CO2 that had been accruing in the plants and soils for thousands of years. Between 10 million and 15 million tons of CO2 continues to be released from the Sacramento Delta each year, an amount equivalent to around 3 percent of California’s total greenhouse gas emissions. READ MORE

Mangrove forests key to carbon sequestration: panel
USA- Mangrove, seagrass and tidal marsh ecosystems sequester up to five times more carbon than tropical rainforests, say marine scientists who are calling for their protection. The scientists say that because carbon dioxide (CO2) builds up not only in the plants but also in the many layers of soil underneath, coastal ecosystems harbour carbon that is thousands of years old. “We are now learning that, if destroyed or degraded, these coastal ecosystems become major emitters of CO2 for years after the plants are removed,” Emily Pidgeon, marine climate change director at Conservation International, said in a release issued recently. “In the simplest terms, it’s like a long slow bleed that is difficult to clot. So we need to urgently halt the loss of these high-carbon ecosystems, to slow the progression of climate change,” she added. READ MORE

US renews shrimp duties for 5 years
USA- A United Statespanel on Tuesday voted to continue import duties on shrimp from Thailand, China, Vietnam, Indiaand Brazilfor five more years in a victory for U.S.shrimpers hurt by last year’s BP oil spill. The U.S. International Trade Commission, by a vote of 5-1, said it believed revoking the anti-dumping order would open the door for the five countries to resume selling frozen shrimp in the U.S.market at unfairly low prices. Louisianashrimper James Blanchard told the panel last month he feared many Gulf shrimpers would be forced out of business if the duties imposed in 2005 were lifted. “Right now, many fishermen are very worried about the long-term impact of the spill. We did everything we could to help clean up the oil and save our fishery, but we just won’t know if there will be long-term effects on our business until the spring,” Blanchard said. READ MORE

SOUTH AMERICA

Sernapesca must publish environmental reports on salmon
CHILE- The Transparency Council has ordered the National Fisheries Service (Sernapesca) to publish environmental reports on the salmon industry, after verifying that the entity’s website has no data in this respect. The ruling was met after a claim made by the Central Council of Ecoceanos, as Sernapesca had refused to submit environmental reports on a salmon fish farm infected with the infectious salmon anemia (ISA) virus, which is owned by the company Acuimag in Region XII. The last data publication was in 2007, reports the newspaper La Segunda. The salmon company claimed that such information “may be used for campaigns with the purpose of damaging the image of the company, as some organizations get high returns from adverse propaganda.” Acuimag told the Council that the information requested was strategic, “concerning the management of their productive activity and business strategy, so that their knowledge would leave them at a disadvantage, violating their property, economic and trade rights.” READ MORE

RIO+20: Toward a new green economy—or a green-washed old economy?
I’ve got good news and bad news about the future of the planet. Good news first. Next year, a honking big global Earth Summit is coming our way — one with a proud heritage. Formally titled the U.N. Conference on Sustainable Development, the meeting is known as RIO+20 because it will come 20 years after the firstEarth Summitin Rioin 1992. That original Earth Summit (itself 20 years after the equally important Stockholm Convention on the Environment and Human Development) gave us an embarrassment of policy riches: the Climate Convention, the Convention on Biological Diversity, Sustainable Development Commission, the Precautionary Principle, a long and ambitious list of promises called Agenda 21, The Forest Principles, and much more. Over a hundred heads of state turned up to Rio Di Janeiro last time amidst intense global attention. This time, the reunion party is going back to Rioagain on June 4-6 2012. Chances are it will all be a big deal again. READ MORE

LAST WORD

Dear All,
This is why I do the work I do. Please watch the video below! Whether it’s mangroves or sharks, it all comes down to one simple fact, we are cutting our own wrists and bleeding to death as the planet that is our birth place and home is wrecked by those whose greed overcomes all of our reason. We deny such planetary issues aa climate change and ocean acidification, and fail to see the Great Extinction now in progress, for fear of the “great recession” that robs us of our jobs and savings. We may find our jobs in the future, but unless we change the direction we are all heading soon and save this planet Earth, we may well be working ourselves 24/7 into extinction. In working for Our Planet Earth, it is not merely a single species we are trying to save, but a multitude of species now threatened and going extinct. But in reality, we are also working to save ourselves. If you care about the future beyond your job and beyond your present means, by all means get involved and, as Gandhi said, “be the change you want to see in the world!” Or if you want to follow the advice of a past US president, get plenty of duct tape and clear plastic to seal yourselves in from the rest of the world “for the times, they are a changing!”
Towards a Future With Hope, Where Jobs Mean We Work For The Betterment Of All,
Alfredo
WATCH THE VIDEO

~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS

If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com

{/PARA}

The MAP News, 259th Ed., 19 March 2011

{PARA}
Dear Friends,
This is the 261th Edition of the Mangrove Action Project News, April 16, 2011.

For the Mangroves,
Alfredo Quarto
Mangrove Action Project

MAP’s Mission

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

DONATE TO MAP

MAP depends on your support in order to produce this e-bulletin and all that we do. Please visit our website and consider donating to MAP today. It is easy to give a one-time donation, or to set up monthly recurring donations via PayPal or Network for Good!

SHRIMP LESS, THINK MORE campaign has changed it’s name to QUESTION YOUR SHRIMP:

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog.
Join MAP on Facebook
Sign the Consumer’s Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

Action Alerts:

Sign Petition telling Senate to Stop Gutting EPA Budget
The U.S. House is trying to gut the EPA, allowing more air pollution to sicken Americans while increasing greenhouse gas emissions. Please sign this petition (link below) then forward to friends. It’s critical that the Senate hears from all of us that care about clean air. Sign Petition

VOTE FOR MAP CURRICULUM FUNDING
MAP will be awarded $25,000, but if we can get enough votes, it may be as much as $100,000. Please vote and send the link to everyone with children on your facebook or email contact lists. Learn More

Help Reject Proposed Rail-line in the adjacent areas of the Sundarbans
Please write to leaders – VIEW SAMPLE LETTER

URGENT ACTION ALERT!!!

Save the Sundarbans Campaign!
Stop The Phulbari Coal Mine Disaster Before It Happens! TAKE ACTION NOW

Volunteer Needed For MAP
1. MAP/Asia Coordinator requires office assistance to support a wide range of projects activities.
VIEW JOB DESCRIPTION
2. HELP WANTED – Interns and/ or Volunteers veeded to Help MAP with Marketing and Advertising. Learn More
3. Translators needed
Spanish and French translators urgently needed to help translate short articles into English for our MAP News! Please write to [email protected], or call 360-452-5866 to volunteer your services.

PLEASE TAKE ACTION TO STOP MINING IN PALAWAN ACTION ALERT

Funding limitations threaten MAP’s programs
Let’s join together now to Save the Mangroves! Donate $25 or more to receive a beautiful Children’s Mangrove Art Calendar for 2011! Please also consider ordering MAP’s beautiful calendars today, they make excellent gifts for the upcoming new year, while helping a great cause in the process! READ MORE

World Atlas of Mangroves donates 10% of purchase price to Mangrove Action Project
LEARN MORE
Help with Kenya Ports Write to leaders

Don’t Let Experimental Genetically Engineered Salmon Reach Your Plate
Take action to keep genetically engineered salmon out of the U.S. CLICK HERE

MAP ISSUES
Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO

FEATURED SECTION

Dear MAP News Readers,
Phulbari rice field 1Please continue to send your letters of concern to the government of Bangladesh. We need to convince the government that it is too costly in terms of environmental and social loss if this mega-project is aproved and this disastrous open pit mine is permitted. We are again including a sample letter and contact information for those officials we are asking you to write. Please do help us halt this project which we believe will have a deleterious effect on the livelihoods and lives of thousands of local people who will be displaced, as well as upon the mangroves of the Sundarbans. MAP calls on our readers to step forward and write your letters of protest against this development to help us stop it from being approved!

Don’t Let Open Pit Coal Mine Destroy Homes, Lives & Mangrove Forests in Bangladesh
Tens of Thousands of People Will Be Affected By This Destructive Project: Impacts on People, Land, Food & Water Forewarned. The Phulbari Coal Mine Project would establish one of the world’s largest open pit coal mines in northwest Bangladesh, forcibly displacing as many as 130,000 people, including more than 2,200 indigenous households. The project would acquire and destroy nearly 6,000 hectares of land, 80 percent of which is fertile agricultural land that produces three crops per year. This land currently serves as a vital rice bowl for a country in which half of all people do not have enough to eat (are food insecure, or exist below the ‘nutrition poverty line’ of 2,122 kcal per day). Project plans clearly state that the company’s UK-based investor, Global Coal Management Resources Plc, will not replace the lands of those evicted – despite that fact that the vast majority are farming households that depend on their lands for food and their subsistence. It is of grave concern that this planned and forced eviction of tens of thousands of people with no land-for-land compensation is planned in one of the world’s most densely populated, land-scarce, and economically poor countries. READ MORE

AFRICA

Great Green Wall Plans to Stop Sahara
300px-Sahara_3SENEGAL- Environmentalists endorsed a wildly ambitious plan to build a “green wall” measuring roughly 10 miles wide and 5,000 miles long across Africawhile meeting in Bonn, Germanyrecently. The groups committed to investing more than $3 billion in the plan. The pan-African Great Green African Wall (GGW), a lush strips of vegetation capable of supporting birds and other animals, would stretch from Djiboutiin the Horn of Africa in the east to Dakar, Senegalin the west on the southern edge of the Sahara. “The Green Wall should be seen as a metaphor for the coordination of a variety of international projects, for economic development, environmental protection, against desertification, and to support political stability in the heart of Africa,” said Boubacar Cissé, African coordinator for the U.N. secretariat against desertification. READ MORE

Environment Day – Forest for Sustainable Development
ETHIOPIA-The African Union Commission (AUC) marked on 3rd March 2011the ninth Africa Environment Day under the theme “Forest for sustainable Development”. Indeed, the United Nations General Assembly declared 2011 International year of Forest, bearing in mind the social, economic and cultural role that they play in communities around the world in the actual context of climate change and global warming. In collaboration with partners such the Unites Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and at a local level, the Nib Environment Club and the Forum for Environment, the AUC added 300 cuttings of olive and guava trees in a plantation of the surroundings of Addis Ababa managed by Nib Environment Club in order to replace eucalyptus trees. In fact, in the past ten year, the scientific community has proven that eucalyptus degrades the soil because it absorbs a lot of water and does not regenerate soil fertility. In this area 300 cuttings of indigenous species have been already planted. In his welcoming address, the President of Nib Environment Club explained that tree plantation is their solution to the challenge posed by climate change. He also underscored the need to act in common in order to impact positively on Africa’s agenda for climate change and to push it forward. In the same vein, the Representative of the Forum for Environment informed the audience of efforts undertaken in Ethiopiain order to rehabilitate degraded forest resources. READ MORE

ASIA

MAP bids farewell and good-luck to intern
Map_Intern_ShannonTHAILAND- MAP would like to thank our volunteer, Shannon Alexander. Shannon spent 4 months (Dec 2010-Mar 2011) with MAP-Asia Office based in Trang province, southern Thailand. She was a great help to MAP. Shannon assisted with a variety of tasks, including, but not limited to, grant applications, editing and formatting documents, writing reports for the MAP newsletter, helping with general publicity, updating the MAP website, and researching new funding opportunities. Shannonhas also helped at our field project on Phra Thong Island assisting Ning-MAP’s Field Project Coordinator with a study tour for Malaysian University students. She has also helped with coordination of the Coastal Community Resource Centre and the Women’s Tie-dye Handicraft Group. Shannon was very professional, efficient, and effective in undertaking any work task assigned to her. Shannon will be missed in Trang and we hope that she will return one day. We wish her success in her future work and study.

Mangrove Conservation in the Western Visayas
pmf-primavera-field-585-mfk021011PHILIPPINES- Mangrove goods and services are essential to the well-being of tropical coastal communities. Fisheries and forestry harvests, coastal protection, and flood regulation are particularly critical to the Philippines, whose 7,150 islands suffer from approximately 20 typhoons yearly and whose people depend on fish as the cheapest and most available protein source. Yet overexploitation and conversion of mangroves to aquaculture ponds have reduced the total area of mangroves in the Philippinesfrom 500,000 to just over 100,000 hectares. Such devastation is compounded by overlapping bureaucracy, poor law enforcement and lack of public awareness.With her Pew Fellowship, Jurgenne Primavera will pursue mangrove conservation in the provinces of Iloiloand Aklan, PanayIslandin the Western Visayas. This region has the most extensive brackish-water ponds in the nation, but it has only 2.5% of the total mangrove forest in the Philippines. Iloilohas very little mangrove cover left and urgently needs rehabilitation. In contrast, the less developed provinceof Aklanhas two healthy patch mangroves remaining, which are in dire need of conservation. These two provinces are representative of similar problems with mangroves that repeat themselves throughout South and Southeast Asia. If a successful model for mangrove conservation can be implemented in these provinces, it will be highly exportable. In fact, the obstacles to mangrove conservation are unusually severe in these provinces, which makes them an “acid test” for conservation programs. READ MORE

EUROPE

Editor’s Note: Again an ugly aspect of the shrimp farm industry raises its dangerous head like a many headed medusa monster- this time it’s in the feed that the shrimp industry uses to feed its “product” and which the unsuspecting consumer eats with little recourse to warnings. And, it is this very GMO chemically-laden soya product that is now being lauded by many in WWF International and their associates in the shrimp industry as a way to reduce costs of raising an already cheap shrimp. Not only are consumers being fooled, but also further environmental damage to Brazil’s and other rain forests is underway with the likes of Monsanto and other chemical producing moguls further enriched by the effort- and all to keep cheap farmed shrimp on the plates and within the palates of wealthy consumer nations. The story below raises some very pressing concerns, not only about the shrimp farm industry and the associated chemical companies that service them with their questionable chemical cocktails, but also the partner industrial NGOs that seem to have bedded down with these same industries in order to further their predetermined goal of “certifying” these same shrimp.

New “Responsible” soy label “Don’t buy the lie”, green groups tell retailers
Brussels/London/Amsterdam, – Supermarkets across the EU are being urged to boycott products containing soy labelled as “responsible” ahead of the introduction of a new EU-wide labelling scheme. A coalition of environmental and civil society groups have written to supermarkets and food companies across Europe including Unilever, Sainsbury’s, Carrefour and AHOLD, highlighting the reasons for their opposition to the Roundtable on Responsible Soy’s plans. Soy, imported mostly from South Americais used widely in Europeas animal feed and to produce biofuels but it is responsible for a host of negative environmental and social impacts in the countries that grow it. The Round Table on Responsible Soy aims to lessen this damage but it will label genetically modified soy, grown on deforested land as responsible. Last year, Eurobarometer found that 61% of the population in Europedid not want GM food. Kirtana Chandrasekaran, food sovereignty programme co-ordinator Friends of the Earth International, one of the signatory groups, said: “The Roundtable on Responsible Soy criteria are so weak that they allow soy plantations to expand at the expense of small-scale farmers, forests, and other important ecosystems. Massive spraying of pesticides will continue, with resulting damage to health and the environment.” The RTRS is a big agribusiness-led initiative with members including agrochemical multinationals Monsanto, Syngenta, and DuPont; grain dealers ADM, Bunge, and Cargill; energy giants Shell and BP; founded by conservation NGO, World Wildlife Fund (WWF). READ MORE

NORTH AMERICA

The 10th annual “Mangrove Ecology, Management and Restoration Training Course” will be held March 1-3, 2012, in Hollywood, Florida, USA.
FLORIDA – The tenth annual “Mangrove Forest Ecology, Management and Restoration” training workshop will be held at the Anne Kolb Nature Center, in Hollywood, Florida, USA, March 1-2, 2012. The training site is within a 500 ha mangrove restoration project at WestLakeParkoperated by BrowardCounty. The award winning project was designed by Roy R. “Robin” Lewis III, who will be teaching the course. Mr. Lewis has taught this very successful course in Cuba, Nigeria, Thailand, Vietnam, Indiaand Sri Lanka. The workshop includes an introduction to mangrove forest ecology, management options and problems, and restoration design issues. The class programs are all presented in a PowerPoint format, and each student is provided with a print out of the presentation and additional handouts including monitoring reports for typical restoration projects. Case studies of 5 successful mangrove restoration projects, and several unsuccessful projects, are discussed. Field trips are taken within the 500 ha West Lake Park mangrove restoration project (now 22 years old) and a new project just one year old, for a comparison. Participants are invited to bring pending project designs to the course for professional review and critique. READ MORE

Blue Carbon: An Oceanic Opportunityto Fight Climate Change
blue-carbon_1U.S.A.- Mangroves are tangled orchards of spindly shrubs that thrive in the interface between land and sea. They bloom in muddy soil where the water is briny and shallow, and the air muggy. Worldwide, these coastal habitats are recognized for their natural beauty and ability to filter pollution, house fish nurseries and buffer shorelines against storms. Less known is their ability to sequester vast amounts of carbon—up to five times that stored in tropical forests. Dubbed “blue carbon” because of their littoral environment, these previously undervalued coastal carbon sinks are beginning to gain attention from the climate and conservation communities. Because they hold so much carbon, destroying them can release substantial amounts of CO2. People around the world wreck coastal habitats through aquaculture, agriculture, timber extraction and real estate development. To date, human encroachment has destroyed more than 35 percent of mangroves, 30 percent of sea grass meadows and 20 percent of salt marshes. Getting local communities to save their mangroves will depend on economics. Land managers, farmers and other developers often opt to control these watery landscapes, thereby transforming them into income-generating acreage, such as a shrimp farm or rice paddy. The carbon markets, with their carbon credits selling between $15 to $20 per ton, could offer an alternative. The fees would encourage land conservation, which would prevent the release of carbon into the atmosphere, and the markets would reward them for mitigating climate change. READ MORE

The Earth’s Sixth Mass Extinction May Be Under Way
CALIFORNIA- A “mass extinction” event is characterized as a period during which at least 75% of the Earth’s species die out in a period of a few million years or less. In the past 540 million years, five such mass extinction events have occurred, but according to a study by UC Berkeley’s Anthony Barnosky and colleagues recently published in the journal Nature, there are signs that we may be entering a sixth such event. These previous mass extinction events (also known as the “Big Five”) are hypothesized to have been caused by combinations of key events such as unusual climate change, changes in atmospheric composition, and abnormally high stress on the ecosystem (except in the case of the Cretaceous, which was caused by an asteroid impact and subsequent effects). Barnosky and colleagues note that scientists are increasingly recognizing modern species extinctions due to various human influences, including some of the same effects which caused the Big Five: co-opting resources, fragmenting habitats, introducing non-native species, spreading pathogens, killing species directly, and changing global climate. READ MORE

Tsunami: Another reason to protect our mangrove forests
GUATEMALA- An earthquake measuring 8.9 on the Richter scale shook the coast of Japanlast Friday, March 11. The tectonic event generated a huge devastating tsunami waves, casualties, destruction of homes, buildings and other structures. For years aquaculture companies deforestated mangroves and affected other marine ecosystems in Indonesia. The installation and expansion of aquaculture ponds have resulted in to destruction and transformation of the coast that has been left bare and unprotected, vulnerable to extreme events, such as the tsunami. The unsustainable development and expansion of activities such as shrimp farming, salterns, hotel construction, monoculture, mining, oil extraction, among several others are the causes for the loss of mangroves and other costal ecosystems in many tropical lands. READ MORE

US Renews Anti-Dumping Tariffs Against Six Shrimp Producing Nations
U.S.A.- The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) on Tuesday voted, 5 to 1, to leave antidumping tariffs on shrimp from Brazil, China, India, Thailandand Vietnamin place. These anti-dumping measures were initiated by the USin 2005 as a response to a petition from the Southern Shrimp Alliance (SSA), which represents fishermen and processors from eight shrimping states in the southern US, who in 2003 filed as petition claiming that foreign exporters were selling shrimp in the U.S.market at less than fair value. Last month’s hearing of the ITC determined that revoking the tariffs would result in the recurrence of dumping, according to the written decision made at this hearing. READ MORE

Mangrove Forest Ecology, Management and Restoration
FLORIDA- The three day training course includes an introduction to mangrove forest ecology, management options and problems, and restoration design issues. There is a total of 24 contact hours for the course and each participant will receive a certificate of completion. A digital copy of the classroom program in .pdf format, along with additional materials including monitoring reports, will be given to each of the participants. Case studies of successful and failed mangrove restoration projects from around the world will be discussed and analyzed. The emphasis of the course is on cost- effective mangrove management and Ecological Mangrove Restoration (EMR) methods for successful restoration. Participants are invited to bring pending project designs or case studies already in implementation for professional review and critique. The second day of the course will include field trips to several mangrove restoration sites just north of Merida. Potential participants may review typical course materials at www.mangroverestoration.com VIEW THIS & OTHER CLASSES

SOUTH AMERICA

Restoring Mangrove Ecosystems is a question of Life or Death
ecuadore_mangrovesECUADORE – Given the imminence of a tsunami hitting on the country’s coast, the group Pueblos Ancestrales del Ecosistema Manglar delEcuador(“Ancient Peoples of the Mangrove Ecosystem of Ecuador”) emphasizes its request to recover the mangrove ecosystem that has been destroyed for the last 40 years by industrial shrimp farming. “This is an important moment to think over the necessity of changing the development models that decimate ecosystems, which are detrimental to our life support”, says Lider Góngora Farías, director of Coordinadora Nacional para la Defensa del Ecosistema Manglar del Ecuador(C_CONDEM). Born on Muisne island on Esmeraldas province, the director of C-CONDEM points out that coastal communities live in perpetual anxiety facing the intense devastation of native and primary forests which people have lived with previously. “There is no favorable State policy towards mangrove restoration, nor to guaranteeing basic rights to coastal communities related to this ecosystem restoration, such as work, food sovereignty, and mainly life. We are witnesses and potential victims of this fatal destruction” says Marcelo Cotera Torres, president of Fundación de Defensa Ecológica de Muisne, Esmeraldas. READ MORE

A CONCHERA SPEAKS

ECUADORE – In May 2009 I set out on a two-month “state-of-the-forests” mangrove tour of the Americas. I wanted to document the plight of mangroves in the region and assess the impact of their loss on the thousands of coastal people who rely on these forests for food, shelter and livelihoods. It would be a wide-ranging journey, both in the places I visited—from Floridaand the Bahamasto Ecuadorand Cuba—and in the people I met: from ecologists studying nutrient pathways in mangrove fauna to activists protesting against the juggernaut of shrimp aquaculture that has been responsible for so much mangrove destruction. I started a blog called “Last Stands” so that people could follow me as I crisscrossed the region, experiencing the unique world of the mangrove forest. These travels provided much of the material for my just-published book, Let Them Eat Shrimp. I invite you to share some of the highlights of my journey in these excerpts from the blog. One of the most moving encounters I had was with a young Afro-Ecuadorian woman from the villageof Tambillowho collects mangrove cockles for a living. As she described the hardships and injustices of her life, I realized that there are thousands of people along the coasts of Latin America(and throughout the tropical zone of the globe) who rely on mangroves for survival, and for whom the loss of these forests is a matter of life and death. Here is the blog post I wrote after meeting Aracely Caiced. READ MORE

LAST WORD

Hello,
I just wanted to thank you again (Robin for teaching the workshop and MAP for sponsoring my student fee waiver) for the opportunity to participate in the mangrove restoration workshop this past week. I really enjoyed your presentation style Robin, and your extensive use of examples to demonstrate the key principles of EMR. Also, I gained a great deal from being able to see several different restorations in various stages first hand, a critical step to understanding of how the hydrologic concepts actually play out. I sincerely appreciate your willingness to share from your years of successes and failures, as I truly believe that the only way we can successfully progress restoration science and application is if we all continue to remember (and demonstrate with our actions) that we are all on the ‘same team’ when it comes to restoration ecology, and I think your workshop is a classic example of the success which can arise from empowering others with the tools and knowledge gained from years of on the ground experience. Thanks again, and I look forward to working with you in the future!

Jason K.
Graduate Research Assistant
University of Rhode IslandGraduateSchoolof Oceanography

~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS

If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com
{/PARA}

The MAP News, 258th Ed., 05 March 2011

{PARA}
Dear Friends,
This is the 258th Edition of the Mangrove Action Project News, March 5, 2011.

For the Mangroves,
Alfredo Quarto
Mangrove Action Project

MAP’s Mission

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

DONATE TO MAP

MAP depends on your support in order to produce this e-bulletin and all that we do. Please visit our website and consider donating to MAP today. It is easy to give a one-time donation, or to set up monthly recurring donations via PayPal or Network for Good!

SHRIMP LESS, THINK MORE campaign has changed it’s name to QUESTION YOUR SHRIMP:

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog.
Join MAP on Facebook
Sign the Consumer’s Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

Action Alerts:

Sign Petition telling Senate to Stop Gutting EPA Budget
The U.S. House is trying to gut the EPA, allowing more air pollution to sicken Americans while increasing greenhouse gas emissions. Please sign this petition (link below) then forward to friends. It’s critical that the Senate hears from all of us that care about clean air. Sign Petition

VOTES STILL NEEDED FOR MAP CURRICULUM FUNDING
MAP will be awarded $25,000, but if we can get enough votes, it may be as much as $100,000. Please vote and send this link to everyone with children on your facebook or email contact lists. Learn More

Help Reject Proposed Rail-line in the adjacent areas of the Sundarbans
Please write to leaders VIEW SAMPLE LETTER

URGENT ACTION ALERT!!!

Save the Sundarbans Campaign!
Stop The Phulbari Coal Mine Disaster Before It Happens! TAKE ACTION NOW

Volunteer Needed For MAP
1. MAP/Asia Coordinator requires office assistance to support a wide range of projects activities.
VIEW JOB DESCRIPTION
2. HELP WANTED – Interns and/ or Volunteers veeded to Help MAP with Marketing and Advertising. Learn More
3. Translators needed
Spanish and French translators urgently needed to help translate short articles into English for our MAP News! Please write to [email protected], or call 360-452-5866 to volunteer your services.

PLEASE TAKE ACTION TO STOP MINING IN PALAWAN– ACTION ALERT

Funding limitations threaten MAP’s programs
Let’s join together now to Save the Mangroves! Donate $25 or more to receive a beautiful Children’s Mangrove Art Calendar for 2011! Please also consider ordering MAP’s beautiful calendars today, they make excellent gifts for the upcoming new year, while helping a great cause in the process!

SALE -ORDER YOUR CALENDAR NOW FOR JUST $8/EACH!
READ MORE

World Atlas of Mangroves donates 10% of purchase price to Mangrove Action Project LEARN MORE

Help with Kenya Ports – Write to leaders
Don’t Let Experimental Genetically Engineered Salmon Reach Your Plate
Take action to keep genetically engineered salmon out of the U.S. CLICK HERE

MAP ISSUES

ISME’s Newsletter recently released CLICK HERE

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO

FEATURED SECTION

Note: With so many stories in this issue of MAP News touting the growth of aquaculture, MAP’s Exec Director Alfredo Quarto was inspired to reflect on the topic.

To Those Who Promote Industrial Shrimp Aquaculture
I remember the devastation caused in the Ca Maa region in the late 1990s when a terrible disease wiped out the industry that itself had wiped out the regions mangroves, wild fisheries and farm lands. Prof. Hong, a renowned mangrove ecologist who had helped organize the planting of over 100,000 ha of mangroves after the US/VN War, related how sad he was that the shrimp industry in Vietnam had so quickly destroyed an equal acreage of mangroves he had helped restore, and at that time of this early shrimp epidemic he said that people were again facing hunger in the Ca Mau region because of this industry’s sudden loss to disease. Later, the same region was again hit by an epidemic of its farmed shrimp. From the 2006 Shrimp Farming Report by Bob Rosenberry: Shrimp farming in the southern provinceof Ca Mauhas taken off to such an extent that it’s being called a ‘phenomenon’. The majority of rice paddies in places like Dam Doi District have been completely restructured as shrimp farms. After five years of economic reforms, shrimp has become the mainstay of the local economy. Thanks to shrimp farming, the District’s revenues have increased from 12 to 24 percent for the last five years. “Shrimp can bring three or four times as much profit as rice farming,” said the deputy chairman of the district. Previously, the entire area was a rice paddy. But will it last? (Rosenberry asks) ‘Shrimp breeding is not sustainable development,’ says the deputy chairman. READ MORE

As UN Marks 2011 the International Year of Forests, Conservation International Highlights Forest Ecosystems on the Edge of Collapse.
To mark the occasion, Conservation International, highlighted the ten most at-risk forested hotspots around the world. These forests have all lost 90% or more of their original habitat and each harbor at least 1500 endemic plant species (species found nowhere else in the world). If these forests are lost, those endemic species are also lost forever. These forests potentially support the lives of close to one billion people who live in or around them, and directly or indirectly depend on the natural resources forest ecosystems provide. The World’s 10 Most Threatened Forest Hotspots are: Indo-Burma, New Zealand, Sundaland, Philippines, Atlantic Forest, Mountains of Southwest China, California Floristic Province, Coastal Forests of Eastern Africa, Madagascar & Indian Ocean Islands and Eastern Afromontane. READ MORE

AFRICA

Mangrove Forests and REDD+
Marine_PhotobankKENYA- The role of marine ecosystems is often overlooked in international climate negotiations, argues UNEP Programme Officer, Gabriel Grimsditch, in this article that explores how mangrove forests are REDD+ relevant and represent great potential as carbon sinks. Mangrove forests are considered highly productive ecosystems and most carbon is either buried in sediments locally and in adjacent systems or stored in forest biomass as the trees grow. Three different global estimates for carbon burial within mangrove systems all converge on a value equivalent to ~18.4 x 1012 g C yr-1 when applying a global area of 160,000 km2 (Chmura et al. 2003). In comparison to tropical forests, mangroves have actually been found to be more efficient at carbon sequestration (Laffoley and Grimsditch, 2009). Mangroves are thus clearly an option for countries interested in developing REDD+ readiness plans. However, the economic value of mangroves is usually ignored or under-valued when economic analyses are being made for coastal developments, despite the obvious economic arguments for including ecosystem services. READ MORE

Note: Although this story a few months old (Sept 2010), it is included here because we have not seen it reported elsewhere
Cross River to partner U.S.on ecosystem management
NIGERIA- To ensure a workable implementation programme is put in place for the management and conservation of its rich ecosystem resources, the Cross River State government is to partner the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Services for technical assistance. Speaking to newsmen after a meeting between the State Government and the developing partners, Dr. Odiga Odiga, said the choice of United States as the leading partner for the programme, which is geared towards poverty reduction through enhancement of international best practice on forestry by stake holders, is borne out of their outstanding track record in forest management which, he noted, has existed for over hundred years. Odiga said the two programmes of mangrove resources management and forestry conservation effort will be integrated to engage the experts in developing a long-term and sustainable programme implementation framework, which is one of the yardsticks in accessing carbon credit for the state and expressed optimism that the state will be better off in terms of economic gains when the programme takes off. Odiga said the joint partnership will afford the state and the country the opportunity to tap from their wealth of experience in mapping out poverty alleviation models through adequate exploration of the ecosystem potentials under an initiative known as Ecosystem for Poverty Alleviation (ESP). READ MORE

ASIA

Note: Your response to our action alert to save the Sunderbans has been working, as the following two stories demonstrate! But the threat of violence continues. Please continue your efforts to support and speak out about this critical region.
Villagers of Phulbari, Barapukuria block highway
Phulbari_Rally3-1-11_no1_1BANGLADESH- Roughly 2,000 protesters united to blockade a highway in the Phulbari region this week and demanded that the government honor a six-point agreement, signed on August 31, 2006. The agreement bans open pit coal mining throughout Bangladesh, and calls for the permanent expulsion of the Phulbari Mine Project’s financier, Global Coal Management (formerly Asia Energy), from the country. Demonstrators also demanded long-term compensation and rehabilitation for crops and lands damaged by land subsidence around the Barapukuria Coal Mine. The protest rally and blockade began at 11:00 amon February 28th and stranded some 500 passenger buses and vehicles on both sides of the highway for an hour. It was organized by Bangladesh’s National Committee to Protect Oil, Gas, Mineral Resources, Power and Seaports. If protestor’s demands are not met by March 27, they intend to organize a six-hour road and rail blockade on the highway linking Barapukuria and Phulbari on March 28. READ MORE

Rule against power plant at Sundarbans
BANGLADESH – The High Court has asked the government to explain why the move to set up the proposed coal-run power plant in the Sundarbans area will not be declared illegal. The bench of justices A H M Shamsuddin Chowdhury and Sheikh Mohammad Zakir Hossain on Tuesday also ruled that all the project activities at Satmari Katakhali under Rampal of Bagerhat be remained stopped. The planning secretary, power secretary, environment secretary, Department of Environment director general, Bangladesh Power Development Board chairman, project director of the plant have been made respondents to the rule returnable within two weeks. The order came following a petition filed by pro-environment organisation Human Rights and Peace for Bangladesh. READ MORE

Thai shrimp exports to match 2010 total
shrimp(1)THAILAND- Thailand’s shrimp exports reached 400,000 metric tons in 2010, up 11 percent from last year, and, according to the Thai Shrimp Association, 2011’s total is expected to match 2010’s. The announcement comes as the Thai delegation prepares for the International Boston Seafood Show next month. About 45 percent of Thailand’s shrimp exports end up in the United States. The U.S.government reported last week that U.S. shrimp imports from Thailand, by far the No. 1 supplier to the U.S.market, were up nearly 6 percent to almost 445 million pounds in 2010. “Consumers around the world have come to trust that Thai shrimp is of the highest quality, free from contamination and meeting and exceeding safety standards, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration have testified,” said Rapibhat Chandarasrivongs, Thailand’s agriculture minister. READ MORE

Aquaculture booms but will wild fish recover?
SINGAPORE- Even as global food prices hit record levels, rising in January for the seventh month in a row amid concerns about future shortages, fish farming is a bright spot in the generally challenging outlook for food production. This is why Japan and many other Asian countries are so interested in aquaculture. In the past, most fish have been caught in the wild. However, in recent decades, a rapidly growing volume and range of fish have been raised in tanks and ponds on land, or in cages and nets in oceans, lakes and rivers, helping to meet growing demand for protein. Aquaculture is now a $100 billion industry. Asiahas led the way in production and exports of both wild capture and farmed fish, making an increasingly important contribution to the region’s food security, while providing expanded employment opportunities and alleviating poverty. Southeast Asia accounts for one-quarter of all fish for human consumption produced in Asia. Worldwide, fisheries support the livelihoods of about 540 million people, or 8 percent of the population. But the most striking development has been in fish farming. The latest estimate from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is that aquaculture will meet more than half of all food fish consumption by next year. READ MORE

Climate change the most serious risk to aquaculture: study
35380_350x280_72_DPI_0VIETNAM- A study conducted on the analysis of stakeholders’ and shrimp farmers’ perceptions in Vietnam’s Ca Mau and Bac Lieu provinces determined that they find climate changes the most serious risk. Small scale farmers and other stakeholders involved in shrimp aquaculture have been suffering the effects of climate changes via frequent extreme weather events. The present study run by the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA) showed that shrimp farmers perceived too much rain, high temperature, canal/river/sea level rise, irregular weather and storms as their most serious concerns regarding monetary losses. The study also ranked the risks of the different climate changes in Ca Mau and Bac Lieu provinces, prioritising the gravity of each of the climate changes that the farmers identified. At the top came high temperature and irregular weather (involving factors such as temperature and rainfall), followed by excessive rain, sea level rise and storms. READ MORE

India to host World Environment Day 2011
INDIA – The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has named India, for the first time, as the global host of World Environment Day 2011 (WED) on June 5, for “embracing the process of a transition to a Green Economy.” This year’s theme ‘Forests: Nature at Your Service’, underscores the intrinsic link between quality of life and the health of forests and forest ecosystems. The WED theme also supports this year’s UN International Year of Forests. Indiais a country of 1.2 billion people, who continue to put pressure on forests especially in densely populated areas where people are cultivating on marginal lands and where overgrazing is contributing to desertification, UNEP said. Two of India’s most prominent cities – Mumbai and Delhi- will be the venue for this year’s global celebration of the environment, with a myriad of activities over several days to inspire Indians and people around the world to take action for the environment. READ MORE

China launches WTO dispute against US shrimp duties
CHINA- The United Statesfinds its controversial practice of ‘zeroing’ in the line of fire again, as Chinaon Monday initiated WTO dispute proceedings over Washington’s anti-dumping duties on Chinese shrimp. Despite having lost several WTO cases on the issue, most recently against Brazilfor duties on orange juice, Washingtonresponded coldly to China’s challenge. “The decision now by Chinato pursue new claims against the United Stateson zeroing only complicates resolution of this issue,” said Nefeterius McPherson, a spokesperson for the UStrade representative’s office. WTO rules authorise governments to levy ‘anti-dumping’ duties on goods it determines to be ‘dumped’, i.e., sold abroad for less than the price they command in the exporter’s home market, if they are injuring domestic competitors. ‘Zeroing’ refers to the practice by US commerce authorities of ignoring (or ‘zeroing out’) instances where imported goods cost more in the USthan in the exporter’s market. Critics of zeroing argue that it artificially inflates anti-dumping margins, making them even more trade-restrictive. READ MORE

EUROPE

Net gains : linking fisheries management, international trade and sustainable development
IUCN releases an overview of the relationship between trade liberalization under the WTO and the requirements of sustainable fisheries management. The document, available for download below, provides a helpful reference for use in trade and environment issues. Using fisheries as an issue requiring urgent attention, it illustrates a range of conservation issues in the trade agenda including subsidies, eco-labels, and trade barriers.

NORTH AMERICA

How the demise of the shark has led to our oceans becoming packed with sardines
USA- The world’s oceans are increasingly over-crowded with sardines, researchers say. In the last 100 years, the number of small fish – such as pilchards, herrings, anchovies, sprats and sardines – has more than doubled, according to a study. The rise is caused by a major decline in big ‘predator fish’ such as sharks, tuna and cod due to over-fishing. Without the natural hunters to keep numbers under control, the population of smaller, plankton-feeding fish has boomed. The scientists who made the discovery say the growing number of small ‘forage fish’ could have serious consequences further down the food chain – and may increase the risk of algae blooms, where populations of simple algae get out of control and choke the oceans. There are growing concerns among scientists about the impacts of overfishing. While there are signs that some fish – such as North Atlantic cod – are recovering from years of industrial fishing, some species – such as the giant bluefin tuna praised by Japanese chefs and served in fashionable London restaurants – are now just few years away from extinction. READ MORE

SOUTH AMERICA

Salmon Farming Takes Off – Again – In Southern Chile
22.02.2011_salmonfarming3_sambeebe.ecotrustCHILE– Nights were cold on the channel of water separates the islandof Chiloéin southern Chilefrom Patagoniaon the mainland. Belisario Barría spent 18 years on the dark waters, guarding the fish pens that transformed this rainy island into a global leader in farmed salmon. “Salmon played a positive role in the community. We didn’t have to leave town and abandon our homes to find work because we had a good job here,” Barría told The Santiago Times. Until several years ago, when the miracle of Chilean salmon self-imploded. A virus decimated fish stocks in the overcrowded pens, and Barría found himself and most of his co-workers unceremoniously let go. The damage inflicted on local economies in the Los Lagos Region forced open debate surrounding the ecological imbalance provoked by the large-scale cultivation of salmon, a non-native species, in Chilean waters. Now, as salmon stocks begin to recover – and moreover, expand – local governments, environmentalists, and citizen groups are pushing the government to act, so the ISA lesson will not be so easily forgotten. READ MORE

Brazilian judge blocks plans for construction of Belo Monte dam
A-boy-plays-with-a-capyba-007BRAZIL – Plans for the construction of the controversial Belo Monte hydroelectric plant in the Amazon rainforest have been suspended by a Brazilian judge over environmental concerns. The proposal to build Belo Monte, which would be the world’s third-largest hydroelectric dam, has sparked protests in Braziland abroad because of its impact on the environment and native Indian tribes in the area. A federal court in Parastate, under judge Ronaldo Desterro, has halted plans for the construction because environmental requirements for the project had not been met. These included contingency plans to assure transportation along rivers where the dam is expected to reduce the water level sharply. The national development bank, BNDES, has also been prohibited from financing the project by the court. READ MORE

SOUTH PACIFIC

Author collaborates with MAP: releases new book
kw and book small”Let Them Eat Shrimp: The Tragic Disappearance of the Rainforests of the Sea” examines the ecological and social costs of mangrove loss, with an emphasis on how the western appetite for cheap seafood has destroyed mangrove forests around the world, stripping their inhabitants of their cultural heritage, livelihoods, and homes. The book has been a five-year project for New Zealand-based writer and photographer Kennedy Warne. It had its beginnings in a feature story Kennedy wrote for National Geographic magazine in 2007. While reporting for that story, he became aware of the massive scale of mangrove depletion and the impact of that loss on coastal communities throughout the developing world, and decided to write a book that would highlight this neglected tragedy. In 2009, joining with MAP’s Latin America co-ordinator Elaine Corets, he made a two-month field trip through Latin America and the Caribbean, visiting mangrove sites and coastal communities in Brazil, Ecuador, Panama, Cuba and the Bahamas and reporting his discoveries in a blog called “Last Stands”. “Let Them Eat Shrimp” offers a timely window into the unique world of the mangroves, showing why they are so vital to so many. READ MORE

Mangroves may get growth spurt from Queensland floods
mg20927983.900-1_300AUSTRAILIA – Mangroves may be the unlikely winners from Australia’s recent floods, benefitting from the nutrient-rich sediment that was washed into their forests. So says Catherine Lovelock of the Universityof Queensland in St. Lucia, Australia, whose team was recording how mangroves in Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia, respond to artificial phosphorus and nitrogen fertilisation when cyclone Pancho hit the area in 2008. Before the cyclone, the trees’ stems grew by less than 25 centimetres per year. After the cyclone, however, some stems shot up by 65 centimetres per year, thanks to floodwaters washing in soils enriched with nutrients from agricultural products. The team’s preliminary results were presented at last year’s International Congress of Ecology in Brisbane. READ MORE

Assessing the vulnerability of fisheries and aquaculture in the tropical Pacific to climate change – an update
NEW CALEDONIA– Presented at the Seventh Heads of Fisheries Meeting, 28 Feb.–4 March 2011 in Noumea, New Caledonia, the Strategic Engagement Policy and Planning Facility has been working closely with the Fisheries, Aquaculture and Marine Environment Division to co-ordinate a comprehensive assessment of the vulnerability of the sector to climate change in the 22 Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs). The assessment covers the area 130oE and 130oW and 25oN and 25oS, and has been designed to identify observed and projected changes to surface climate and the ocean in the tropical Pacific. The document also looks at the effects of these changes on the habitats that support fisheries and aquaculture in the region (the open ocean, coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, and freshwater rivers) as well as the implications of alterations to fish stocks due to climate change for economic development, government revenue, food security and livelihoods throughout the region. Download the PDF

LAST WORD

MangroveStudents celebrate MangroveOur last word this issue is offered by Vivianna Maurra of Ecoprogreso in Columbia who sent this image of classmates celebrating fellow classmate Edinson Luis Díaz Berrío, whose artwork was selected as the winning submission for MAP’s 2011 Children’s calendar. If you’d like to help support Ecoprogreso’s work being done to protect mangroves in Columbia please contact Monica Quarto at [email protected] to find out more.
MangroveStudents celebrate Mangrove
VIEW MORE PHOTOS ON FACEBOOK

Also note, that MAP calendars are still available, and have been discounted to US$8.00. Please support this important project to bring future caretakers to the protection of global forests.

~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS

If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com
{/PARA}

The MAP News, 257th Ed., 19 February 2011

{PARA}
Dear Friends,
This is the 257th Edition of the Mangrove Action Project News, February 19, 2011.

For the Mangroves,
Alfredo Quarto
Mangrove Action Project

MAP’s Mission

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

DONATE TO MAP

MAP depends on your support in order to produce this e-bulletin and all that we do. Please visit our website and consider donating to MAP today. It is easy to give a one-time donation, or to set up monthly recurring donations via PayPal or Network for Good!

SHRIMP LESS, THINK MORE campaign has changed it’s name to QUESTION YOUR SHRIMP:

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog.
Join MAP on Facebook
Sign the Consumer’s Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

Action Alerts:

VOTE FOR MAP CURRICULUM FUNDING
MAP will be awarded $25,000, but if we can get enough votes, it may be as much as $100,000. Please vote and send the link to everyone with children on your facebook or email contact lists. Learn More

Help Reject Proposed Rail-line in the adjacent areas of the Sundarbans
Please write to leaders VIEW SAMPLE LETTER

URGENT ACTION ALERT!!!

Save the Sundarbans Campaign!
Stop The Phulbari Coal Mine Disaster Before It Happens! TAKE ACTION NOW

Volunteer Needed For MAP
1. MAP/Asia Coordinator requires office assistance to support a wide range of projects activities.
VIEW JOB DESCRIPTION
2. HELP WANTED – Interns and/ or Volunteers veeded to Help MAP with Marketing and Advertising. Learn More
3. Translators needed
Spanish and French translators urgently needed to help translate short articles into English for our MAP News! Please write to [email protected], or call 360-452-5866 to volunteer your services.

PLEASE TAKE ACTION TO STOP MINING IN PALAWAN ACTION ALERT

Funding limitations threaten MAP’s programs
Let’s join together now to Save the Mangroves! Donate $25 or more to receive a beautiful Children’s Mangrove Art Calendar for 2011! Please also consider ordering MAP’s beautiful calendars today, they make excellent gifts for the upcoming new year, while helping a great cause in the process! READ MORE

World Atlas of Mangroves donates 10% of purchase price to Mangrove Action Project LEARN MORE

Help with Kenya Ports – Write to leaders
Don’t Let Experimental Genetically Engineered Salmon Reach Your Plate
Take action to keep genetically engineered salmon out of the U.S.CLICK HERE

MAP ISSUES

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO

FEATURED SECTION

UN declares 2011 “International Year of Forests”
The declaration of 2011 as the United Nation’s “International Year of the Forest” presents “opportunities for Mangrove Action Project and other allies to consider their common struggle to conserve and restore our planet’s beleaguered mangroves”, says Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto. In a letter to it’s supporters, Quarto worried that misconceptions about mangroves and their environment continue to prevent consumers and others to take any real action to protect coastal forests, and that the true causes of deforestation are not given concerted attention. According to Quarto, this threatens to make the “Year of the Forest “just another ineffective publicity campaign, bringing little hope for effective solutions.” Quarto called for environmentalists, scientists and NGO’s around the globe to “place mangrove forests clearly as a priority ecosystem needing conservation and restoration.” READ MORE

NEWS STORIES BY REGION

AFRICA

Kenya’s first six Aqua Shops open their doors to fish farmers
KENYA – The first six Aqua Shops in Western Kenya opened their doors to new fish farmers in Western Kenya last week. The shops are located in Funyula, Nambomboto, and Bukiri shopping centres within Samia; and Ahero, Katito and Oboch in Nyakach Districts respectively. These franchised outlets will deliver a wide range of affordable, quality-assured aquaculture products and services including advice and inputs. The Minister of Fisheries Development Hon. Amason Kingi officially launched the shops on Friday at Nyabondo, Oboch shopping centre. In attendance was also the 6 aquashop operators, a range of commercial aquaculture input and service providers, and over 30 fish farmers from the two pilot districts, as well as political leaders, district administrators, Ministry of Fisheries officials and potential new entrants into aquaculture. READ MORE

Marine Resource Protection – Diplomats Urged To Join the Fight
CAMEROON – The Ministry of Environment organized a sensitization meeting in Yaounde to solicit the support and assistance of diplomats. The Minister of Environment and Nature Protection, Hele Pierre has called on foreign diplomats based in the country to join efforts in protecting the degrading mangrove ecosystems of West African countries which he said were being threatened by growing human activity and climate change. Opening a one-day sensitization seminar at Yaounde’s Mont Febe Hotel on Tuesday February 15 on “Combating Living Resource Depletion and Coastal Area Degradation in the Guinea Current through Ecosystem-based Regional Actions” organized for the diplomats, the Minister noted that there was urgent need to support the efforts of 16 Central and West African countries that had committed to protecting the large marine resources of their countries in order to live behind a good legacy for future generations. READ MORE

ASIA

WWF gave in to pressure and threats from the communist regime in Vietnam
VIETNAM – One of the world’s most powerful environmental organizations, WWF, gave in to pressure and threats from the communist regime in Vietnam by taking the key export fish of Vietnam – Pangasius – off its redlist( a list of fish that consumers should avoid). Meanwhile the serious environmental problems caused by the farming of pangasius in Vietnam remains. In October last year, the the World Wildlife Fund, WWF, released its new fish guide, a guide many food retailers and consumers across Europe use to adjust their purchases after. The cultivated pangasius,or striped catfish, as it is also known, a popular low priced fish, was for the first time given a red light. The red light indicates that the WWF urge consumers not to purchase this fish. “When we did this analysis we saw that the production of Pangasius has deteriorated,” said Inger Näslund who is the seafood expert at WWF in Sweden. The WWF:s decision to put Pangasius on their red list was strongly condemned by the Vietnamese government. READ MORE

Mumbai NGO releases educational booklet
INDIA – Soonabai Pirojsha Godrej Marine Ecology Centre in Mumbai, India has published an informative booklet on Mangroves ‘THE MANGROVES’ to communicate the importance of Mangrove Conservation in simple language to diverse sectors in the society such as students, teachers, NGOs, citizens groups and general masses. The Marathi (local language) version of the booklet was released on this wetlands day 2nd February. Copies of the booklets in English and Marathi are available for a nominal price. Write to Dr. Maya Mahajan, Executive Officer, Soonabai Pirojsha Godrej Marine Ecology Centre at [email protected] for copies of the booklet. READ MORE

Cultural Survival Launches Campaign to Halt Coal Mine in Bangladesh
BANGLADESH – Seeking to avert a “humanitarian and ecological catastrophe,” Cultural Survival launched a campaign to prevent UK-based Global Coal Management Resources (GCM) from building one of the world’s largest open-pit coal mines in one of the world’s poorest countries, Bangladesh. If allowed to move forward, GCM’s Phulbari Coal Mine Project would forcibly displace as many as 220,000 people, bulldoze thousands of homes, and destroy 12,000 acres of fertile farmland. “The project threatens some of Bangladesh’s most vulnerable Indigenous peoples who trace their ancestry in the region back 5,000 years,” says campaign organizer Paula Palmer, who directs Cultural Survival’s Global Response Program. Bangladesh’s National Indigenous Union (Jatiya Adivasi Parishad) estimates that 50,000 Indigenous people belonging to 23 different tribal groups would be displaced or impoverished by the mine. READ MORE

‘Declare mangroves protected forests’
thumbINDIA – Is it a case of fence eating the crop? Green activists say the government is the biggest culprit for the depletion of mangrove forests in India. The forest department has little manpower to spare for protecting mangroves and where campaigns have been successful, public support has played a crucial role. A natural breeding ground for several species, mangrove forests act as natural lungs and kidneys of the ecosystem. They absorbs heavy metals and reduce harm to human habitat. It plays a major mitigating role in the changing climatic scenario and time and again, its importance has been highlighted in buffering natural hazards such as cyclones, storm surges and erosion. “All you need is political will to protect mangroves. There is no consistency in government approach,” says Debi Goenka, executive trustee of Conservation Action Trust, Mumbai. “There are no strong measures to ensure protection for mangroves. READ MORE

World’s first land-based aquaculture farm now under construction in Sri Lanka
SRI LANKA – The world’s first land- based aquaculture farm is now under construction in Sri Lanka. This farm complex for Asian species of fish – Sea Bass (Barramundi) designed and engineered by Hobas AS, an internationally-recognized Norwegian aquaculture specialist company is nearing completion at Thalahena, Negombo. The farm, according to Managing Director of Hobas AS, Asbjorn Drengstig is the first of its kind in existence anywhere in the world. He said, “Initially the fingerlings of the Asian Sea Bass (Barramundi) usually found in sub tropical regions in Asia and the Pacific will be introduced to the huge tank at the farm complex.” Even though this fish species can withstand varied strengths of salinity ranging from freshwater to sea water, lower salinity promotes full scale growth, according to research findings. Usually the Asian Sea Bass is ready to be harvested when the size of the fish reaches about 2.5 cm, he said. Referring to the aims and objectives of constructing the land-based aquaculture farm at Thalahena, Mr Drengstig reiterated that it is an experimental demonstration farm for prospective land-based aquaculture industrialists in Sri Lanka and other countries in the Asian region. READ MORE

Ecological impacts in shrimp culture
MYANMAR – Shrimp farms of all types, from extensive to super-intensive, can cause severe ecological problems wherever they are located. For extensive farms, huge areas of mangroves were cleared, reducing biodiversity. During the 1980s and 1990s, about 35% of the world’s mangrove forests have vanished. Shrimp farming was a major cause of this, accounting for over a third of it according to one study;other studies report between 5% and 10% globally, with enormous regional variability. Other causes of mangrove destruction are population pressure, logging, pollution from other industries, or conversion to other uses such as salt pans. Mangroves, through their roots, help stabilize a coastline and capture sediments; their removal has led to a marked increase of erosion and less protection against floods. Mangrove estuaries are also especially rich and productive ecosystems and provide the spawning grounds for many species of fish, including many commercially important ones. Many countries have protected their mangroves and forbidden the construction of new shrimp farms in tidal or mangrove areas. The enforcement of the respective laws is often problematic, though, and especially in the least developed countries such as Bangladesh, Myanmar, or Vietnam the conversion of mangroves to shrimp farms remains an issue for areas such as the Myanmar Coast mangroves. READ MORE

EUROPE

FAO releases 1985-2005 report on mangroves
a1427e00The first attempt at estimating the total mangrove area in the world was undertaken as part of the FAO/United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Tropical Forest Resources Assessment in 1980, where the world total was estimated as 15.6 million hectares. More recent estimates have ranged from 12 to 20 million hectares. Countries with small areas of mangroves have been excluded from many studies because of lack of information and because their combined area of mangroves would not significantly affect the world total. With the preparation of the present report, FAO aims to facilitate access to comprehensive information on the current and past extent of mangroves in all countries and territories in which they exist. The information provided in this report, as well as the gaps in information that it highlights, will assist mangrove managers and policy- and decision-makers worldwide. READ MORE

NORTH AMERICA

From MAP’s Exec Dir: Good to see this, as MAP also was involved in this via our action alerts and information sharing. I believe I had forwarded them info on ELAW early on in their struggle. Sadly, the woman who led the battle there died of a stroke about 8 months ago. She was a zealous activist and organizer, and the real inspiration for the groups there to take on this battle. ELAW does a good job of taking credit, but she should be named as well.

Victory in Trinidad & Tobago
TRINIBAD & TOBAGO – Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide partners in the Caribbean have won a major victory and prevented an environmental disaster. ELAW teamed up with local partners in Trinidad and Tobago to prevent construction of a port that would have wreaked havoc on wetlands and local fishing communities. Rajendra Ramlogan at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad and Tobago wrote “We wish to express our heartfelt appreciation for the assistance provided by Mark Chernaik [ELAW Staff Scientist] with respect to a proposed port in Trinidad that would have had a disastrous effect on our wetlands and fishing industry. READ MORE

Central America Has Highest Rate of Forest Loss in Region
GUATEMALA CITY – Central America has suffered the highest rate of forest loss in Latin America over the last 10 years, despite a growing number of plans aimed at curbing the decline, the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) reports. FAO’s State of the World’s Forests report says the average rate of loss of forest cover in Central America, which is made up of Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala City, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama, was 1.19 percent a year between 2000 and 2010, compared to a global rate of just 0.13 percent. The region’s forested area shrank from 21.9 million hectares in 2000 to 19.4 million hectares in 2010. But the situation is not drastic everywhere. In the Caribbean, for example, forest area expanded by one million hectares from 1990 to 2010, “mainly through natural expansion of forest onto abandoned agricultural land,” says the study presented in late January, at the start of 2011, the International Year of Forests. The outlook for Central America remains bleak, however, despite some improvements. READ MORE

Call to celebrate Earth Hour
At 8.30pm on Saturday 26 March 2011, Earth Hour will celebrate a worldwide commitment to ongoing change for the betterment of the one thing that unites us all – the planet. Here is the official YouTube video, please pass on and share with your colleagues and networks READ MORE

NOAA proposes first US aquaculture guidelines
USA – The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has proposed the United States’ first aquaculture policy, which it said responds to growing demand for local, safe, sustainably produced seafood. Domestic aquaculture – seafood that is farmed rather than caught in the wild – currently only accounts for about five percent of seafood consumed in the United States. Eighty-four percent the United States’ seafood is imported and about half of that comes from aquaculture, the NOAA said – and it expects demand, both in the US and worldwide, to increase rapidly. Its new draft policy document has a strong focus on how domestic aquaculture can be carried out sustainably, which the agency said comes from growing interest in seafood’s health benefits as well as increasing consumer concern about how fish is produced. “Growing consumer demand for safe, local, and sustainably produced seafood, increasing energy costs, and the decline of fishing-related industries and working waterfronts are emerging drivers that support sustainable domestic aquaculture production,” the NOAA said. READ MORE

Environmental Justice in Central America’s Ramsar Site #1000
Editors Note – This article was submitted to us in Spanish. While google allows us to easily translate such files, the translations are literal and need better editing. MAP is currently looking for readers to help us translate news from Spanish, French and other languages. Please contact us if you would be willing to help us provide voices to communities around the world who would otherwise have little voice to speak to the world.

HONDURAS – In early December 2010, the environmental group CODDEFFAGOLF visited Honduran officials to investigate allegations of destruction of mangroves in the area known as” Centro Náutico, or Portillo of “Gloria” San Lorenzo, Honduras, where environmental authorities had discovered deforestation of mangroves to build shrimp farms in this national wetland more than 10 years ago, as well as an existing shrimp farm that had been abandoned and naturally regenerating. The Prosecutors Office of Valle, said he would resume the case and apply the law …. The months passed, and the prosecutors failed to proceed, which contrasts sharply with the speed with which they acted against the humble men and women of Zacate Grande, Valle, when they made an outcry of protest, and were immediately beaten and jailed. LEA MAS

THE LAST WORD

This issues last word comes from our reader “Fritzi” who submitted this article and made the following comment “As follow up to your story on poisoning mangroves (MAP NEWS #256 “Singer: Mangrove poisoning update”), a recent issue of Scientific American has also come out with might be called a companion piece. Perhaps it’s the light at the end of a very long tunnel.”

Welcome weeds: How alien invasion could save the Earth
When Ariel Lugo takes visitors to the rainforests of Puerto Rico, he likes to play a little trick. First the veteran forest ecologist shows off the beautiful surroundings: the diversity of plant life on the forest floor; the densely packed trees merging into a canopy high overhead; the birds whose calls fill the lush habitat with sound. Only when his audience is suitably impressed does he reveal that they are actually in the midst of what many conservationists would dismiss as weeds – a ragtag collection of non-native species growing uncontrolled on land once used for agriculture. READ MORE

~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS

If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com
{/PARA}

The MAP News, 256th Ed., 05 February 2011

{PARA}
Dear Friends,
Exciting news about our mangrove teachers curriculum. We’ve been awarded a substantial amount of money but with your help we could get even more! Please help support this important project by voting – read the featured story for details.

For the Mangroves,
Alfredo Quarto
Mangrove Action Project

MAP’s Mission

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

DONATE TO MAP

MAP depends on your support in order to produce this e-bulletin and all that we do. Please visit our website and consider donating to MAP today. It is easy to give a one-time donation, or to set up monthly recurring donations via PayPal or Network for Good!

SHRIMP LESS, THINK MORE campaign has changed it’s name to QUESTION YOUR SHRIMP:

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog.
Join MAP on Facebook
Sign the Consumer’s Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

Action Alerts:

VOTE FOR MAP CURRICULUM FUNDING
MAP will be awarded $25,000, but if we can get enough votes, it may be as much as $100,000. Please vote and send the link to everyone with children on your facebook or email contact lists. Learn More

Help Reject Proposed Rail-line in the adjacent areas of the Sundarbans
Please write to leaders VIEW SAMPLE LETTER

URGENT ACTION ALERT!!!

Save the Sundarbans Campaign!
Stop The Phulbari Coal Mine Disaster Before It Happens! TAKE ACTION NOW

Volunteer Needed For MAP
MAP/Asia Coordinator requires office assistance to support a wide range of projects activities.
VIEW JOB DESCRIPTION

PLEASE TAKE ACTION TO STOP MINING IN PALAWAN ACTION ALERT

Funding limitations threaten MAP’s programs
Let’s join together now to Save the Mangroves! Donate $25 or more to receive a beautiful Children’s Mangrove Art Calendar for 2011! Please also consider ordering MAP’s beautiful calendars today, they make excellent gifts for the upcoming new year, while helping a great cause in the process! READ MORE

Join the discussion on sustainable gourmet foods
Click Here

Serious Threats to the Sea Turtles
Take Action to Protect India’s Ancient Olive Ridley Population
1) Click here to add your name to a petition opposing the POSCO port in Orissa.
2) Click here to donate to support STRP’s international efforts to protect sea turtles.

Rethinking Plastics Campaign
We’re addicted to plastic, especially plastic bags. If you are like 95% of US shoppers, whenever you purchase anything, it ends up in a plastic bag. Join the Campaign. Sign up for our Plastics Newsletter ALSO View Video

India’s Ports Approved in Sensitive Mangrove Areas
TATA receives fast tracking; take our poll and tell us why environmental concerns were overlooked TELL US

World Atlas of Mangroves donates 10% of purchase price to Mangrove Action Project LEARN MORE

Help with Kenya Ports Write to leaders

Don’t Let Experimental Genetically Engineered Salmon Reach Your Plate
Take action to keep genetically engineered salmon out of the U.S.CLICK HERE

Urgent Appeal to all wildlife and nature protection organizations in the world
Stop Saudi destruction of mangroves and tideflats. WRITE TO OFFICIALS

Borneo: Stop the company from stealing our forests!
The indigenous people of Western Kalimantan(Borneo) are fighting against deforestation for four years. The Indonesian government as well as the company clearing their forest have ignored the demands of the Dayak communities so far. Now, they need international support. Please help by TAKING ACTION NOW

Action Alert: Papua New Guinea – Don’t Dump Poisons into the Sea!
The government of Papua New Guinea doesn’t want to hear from us. It has authorized a Chinese mining company to dump toxic waste into the sea, and it is determined to stifle dissent from every quarter.

JAMAICA’S FONT HILL
Save Font Hill Nature Preserve from development. Please Sign our Petition

MAP ISSUES

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

FEATURED SECTION

MAP’s Mangrove Curriculum selected for funding – BUT WE NEED YOUR VOTE
MAP is excited to announce it’s mangrove curriculum development in China has been selected by Disney in their Friends For Change programme to receive a substantial grant. There are only five organisations that qualify for this round of funding, and MAP’s curriculum has been chosen as one to be voted for. MAP will receive a minimum of $25,000 but, if enough people vote, the amount could double or potentially be awarded the top prize of $100,000. VOTING ENDS April 1st, 2011 so please encourage anyone with children to sign on and vote for OUR PROJECT!!!
Here’s what you do
Go to: Select from lists of Countries below
Click on: Take Action – top left of screen
Click on: Register – top right of screen
Fill in the blanks and register on-line
Go back to the Home page and
Click on: “Explore & Vote”
Vote for the MAP’s curriculum
U.S. Voters : SIGN IN HERE
This can now also be done in Europe, not just the US, Here’s the info on European registration:
Germany- www.disney.de/friendsforchange
France- http://www.disney.fr/ensembleonchangetout/
Netherlands- www.disney.nl/friendsforchange
Belgium- www.disney.be/friendsforchange
Poland- www.disney.pl/friendsforchange
UK- www.disney.co.uk/friendsforchange
Italy- www.disney.it/friendsforchange
Sweden- www.disney.se/friendsforchange
Finland- www.disney.fi/friendsforchange
Norway- www.disney.no/friendsforchange
Denmark- www.disney.dk/friendsforchange

AFRICA

Towards Sustaining Better Environment in Ondo
NIGERIA- Among states in southwest Nigeria, Ondo stands out. It is not just the government’s attitude to tackle the menace by taking steps to plant trees that is commendable, but even the youth and children in the state are kept abreast on happenings in climate and environmental challenges in their immediate environments. Only recently some students were trained as climate change ambassadors and peer educators. READ MORE

Charcoal Trade Booming Despite Ban
Although the export of charcoal has been banned by Somalia’s Transitional Federal Government (TFG), the trade is booming in areas controlled by Islamist opposition groups, with locals saying volumes have risen sharply in past months. “The trade in charcoal in [the port city of] Kismayo seems to be picking up every day, with the current level and intensity being the highest ever,” a civil society source, who requested anonymity, told IRIN on 19 January. Previously cutting trees and burning charcoal was a low-key, low-technology affair, but “now they are using very sophisticated saws and equipment”. READ MORE

ASIA

Philippines-Palawan: environmental advocate and journalist shot dead
PHILIPPINES– Dr. Gerry Ortega, an environmental advocate and broadcast journalist was shot Jan 24 in Puerto Princesa City, Palawan. The wildlife veterinarian was killed by a gunman in SanPedroVillag eafter finishing his daily radio program on DWAR Palawan. According to the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines, Ortega is the 142nd journalist killed since 1986. He was the third journalist slain under the Aquino administration. A staunch critic of mining operations and local officials in Palawan, Ortega was the anchor of the daily primetime program “Ramatak,” aired over dwAR, RMN’s local affiliate in Palawan. Alleged gunman Marlon Dicamata de Chavez, alias Marvin Alcaraz, 31, a resident of Barangay Waling-Waling in Taguig City, was arrested after the shooting. READ MORE

PLEASE TAKE ACTION TO STOP MINING IN PALAWAN ACTION ALERT

Editors Note: The proposed dam mentioned in this story will hurt the mangrove forests on the Mekong Delta as well as many other life forms including migratory fish, birds and local fishing communities depending on the river for their livelihoods. MAP has endorsed the letter written to the MRC.

Group urges Mekon River Council to uphold international standards
Laos – On the occasion of the Mekong River Commission’s 17th Meeting of the MRC Council, a group of concerned scientists and campaigners have asked the council to consider the impacts of the proposed Mekong River Dam at Xayaburi. The group wrote the MRC member governments to take urgent measures to ensure that the decision over the proposed Xayaburi Dam on the Mekong River’s mainstream in Xayaboury province, Lao PDR, along with other planned Mekong mainstream dams, uphold international standards of public accountability and transparency, and ensure that the opinions of Mekong riparian communities are central to any decision taken. READ MORE

Philippines farmers shift to seaweeds
PHILIPPINES – With the strong support of Philippines Lanao del Norte provincial government, many local farmers and fishermen in the province have shifted to seaweed growing which they discovered to be not only more profitable but also less physically laborious, it was learned here recently. Lanao del Norte Gov. Khalid Q. Dimaporo, with the technical assistance of the Department of Science and Technology (DoST), recently implemented the Comprehensive Livelihood Emergency and Employment Program (CLEEP) for seaweed farming in the coastal towns of Kolambugan, Tubod, Maranding, Bacolod, Lala, and Karomatan. Dimaporo said that in Kolambugan’s seaside village of Mangaalone, at least 75 families initially became seaweed growers who received their seedlings from the Provincial Agriculture Office (PAO) in this capital town. The positive impact of PAO’s initial seaweed distribution in Manga, Dimaporo said, prompted other local families to troop to this town to secure their own seedlings even as similar moves were later taken by other villagers from other coastal municipalities until the PAO could hardly cope with the demand for seaweed seedlings. READ MORE

Philippines focuses on coastal management program
PHILIPPINES- Philippines Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) has started its multi-sectoral consultation on the country’s integrated management program for the creation of more efficient measures on the protection of the marine biodiversity. DENR’s Coastal and Marine Management Office (CMM) Executive Director Carlo Custodio said that as early as 2006, the government has already adopted integrated coastal management (ICM) as the development strategy for the country’s coastal and marine environment as per Executive Order (EO) 533 signed by former President Arroyo. But it is only now that the national program is being crafted to address the complex environmental as well as socio-economic issues facing the sector with the end in view of promoting the optimum utilization and sustainable development of the coastal and marine environment. Data gathered by the CMMO on the country’s coastal and marine resources showed that the Philippines has a total of 36,289 kilometers of coastline, one of the longest in the world. READ MORE

Rejuvenation of Mangroves for Disaster Management
INDIA – Immediately after the Orissa Super Cyclone of 1999, internationally reputed environmentalist Dr Vandana Shiva and the late Banka Bihari Das invited national and international environmentalists and thinkers in to a meeting held at Bhubaneswar on 26 January 2000 to assess the situation and develop a comprehensive and effective model which can prevent future large scale destruction of lives and properties of the coastal communities from sea borne disasters arising from the turbulent Bay of Bengal identified as the second most dangerous sea of the world after the Gulf of Mexico. Years after that Dr. Vandana Shiva arranged funds for the authors to implement the concept on the Balasore Coast. Today there exists a substantial concentration of true mangrove diversity comprising of a total of about 2 lakh plants of 22 species in an area of coastal mud flats at the Sartha Estuary on Balasore Coast. The site also creates the perspectives of a future research, education and ecotourism site. Besides, the plants do have known commercial and medicinal usages and that way it will benefit the local community in more ways. READ MORE

EUROPE

Scientists race to protect world’s most endangered corals
0111Elkhorn314U.K.- As corals around the world disappear at alarming rates, scientists are racing to protect the ones they can. At a workshop led by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), the world’s foremost coral experts met in response to a decade of unprecedented reef destruction to identify and develop conservation plans for the ten most critically endangered coral species. READ MORE

Study backs community management to save world’s fisheries
FRANCE- A study by marine scientists has given powerful backing to campaigners who say the future of many of the world’s fisheries lies in co-management by government, local people and fishermen. Publishing in the science journal Nature in January, researchers said the traditional “top-down” approach – trawling quotas set down and policed by central authorities – was failing in many fisheries as rules were often poorly implemented or abused. The best-managed fisheries are those that bring together local representatives and fishermen who co-determine how the resources should be managed and enforce these decisions effectively, they said. “They have very strong, cohesive communities with strong leaders,” said Nicolas Gutierrez, a University of Washington fishery scientist, who headed the paper. READ MORE

NORTH AMERICA

World’s ten most threatened forests listed at launch of a special year
U.S.A. – To mark the launch today of the the International Year of Forests, the US-based Conservation International has listed the ten most at-risk forested hotspots around the world – all but one predominantly tropical. The aim is to focus attention on the need to increase the protection of forests, including their crucial importance for biodiversity conservation, climate stabilisation and economic development. The listed forests have all lost 90 per cent or more of their original habitat and each harbours at least 1500 endemic plant species – species found nowhere else in the world. If these forests are lost, says Conservation International, those endemic species are also lost forever. READ MORE

As UN Declares International Year of Forests, Groups Demand Real Solutions to Root Causes of Deforestation
U.S.A. At the launch of the High Level segment of the UN Forum on Forests, Mr. Sha Zhukan, UN Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs will declare 2011 “the International Year of Forests.” Civil society groups advocating forest protection, Indigenous Rights, and climate justice are launching a program called “The Future of Forests,” to ensure that forest protection strategies address the real causes of global forest decline, and are not oriented toward markets or profit-making. Critics from Global Justice Ecology Project, Global Forest Coalition, Dogwood Alliance, Timberwatch Coalition, BiofuelWatch, and Indigenous Environmental Network charge that the UN’s premier forest scheme: REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation), advanced amidst controversy at the recent UN Climate Summit in Cancún, will not protect forests or stop deforestation. READ MORE

New study suggests global pacts like REDD ignore primary causes of destruction of forests
U.S.A. A new study issued in January by some of the world’s top experts on forest governance finds fault with a spate of international accords, and helps explain their failure to stop rampant destruction of the world’s most vulnerable forests. “Our findings suggest that disregarding the impact on forests of sectors such as agriculture and energy will doom any new international efforts whose goal is to conserve forests and slow climate change,” said Jeremy Rayner, a professor at the University of Saskatchewan Graduate School of Public Policy and chair of the panel of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO) that produced the new assessment. “With this report in hand, we can say with greater certainty that the success of current efforts to protect forests through a global climate change agreement will depend in part on whether negotiators integrate these findings into their policy proposals.” READ MORE

Editors Note – Why is it that when they play BINGO, the Multi-Nationals always seem to win?
Dow Chemical Partners With The Nature Conservancy to Improve Sustainablity
U.S.A. – The Dow Chemical Company and The Nature Conservancy announced a new collaboration between the two organizations to help Dow recognize, value and incorporate nature into its business goals, decisions and strategies. Speaking at the Detroit Economic Club, Andrew Liveris, Dow’s chairman and chief executive officer, said the company and its foundation are committing $10 million to the collaboration over the next five years. The aim of the collaboration is to advance the incorporation of the value of nature into business, and to take action to protect the Earth’s natural systems and the services they provide people, for the benefit of business and society. READ MORE

Fish consumption reaches all-time high
U.S.A. – The contribution of fish to global diets has reached a record of about 17 kg per person on average, supplying over three billion people with at least 15 percent of their average animal protein intake. This increase is due mainly to the ever-growing production of aquaculture which is set to overtake capture fisheries as a source of food fish, according to the State of the World’s Fisheries and Aquaculture, recently released. The report also stressed that the status of global fish stocks has not improved. Overall, fisheries and aquaculture support the livelihoods of an estimated 540 million people, or eight percent of the world population. People have never eaten as much fish and more people than ever are employed in or depend on the sector. Fish products continue to be the most-traded of food commodities, worth a record $102 billion in 2008, up nine percent from 2007. READ MORE

Global campaign launched against Big Aquaculture
CANADA- The brand-new Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture (GAAIA) has commenced a global campaign against Big Aquaculture warning consumers about the dangers of salmon farming. This month, the alliance will issue a new report on salmon called “Smoke on the Water, Cancer on the Coast” and later others on shrimp, tuna and genetically engineered (GE) fish. GAAIA’s “Salmon Farming Kills” campaign uses similar graphic imagery to the “Smoking Kills” campaigns employed against Big Tobacco. “Salmon farming kills around the world and should carry a global health warning,” said Don Staniford, global coordinator for GAAIA in British Columbia (BC). “As good global citizens we need to face the fact that salmon farming seriously damages human health, the health of our global ocean and the health of wild fish.” READ MORE

Video demonstrates need for mangrove conservation
The Cuero y Salado region is a unique estuary zone at the convergence of the Atlantic Ocean and the The Cuero and Salado Rivers. Habitat destruction has been prevalent in the areas as communities struggle with reduced fishing stocks and place larger burdens on the surrounding ecosystem in an attempt to garner enough food and fuel to support their families. The mangrove forest, which is crucial to support native biodiversity is being lost as local people and encroaching development, vie for scarce natural resources. Our objectives are to restore and rehabilitate native mangrove forests and provide access to a diversity of food sources and value-added livelihood opportunities using the Analog Forestry system in the Cuero y Salado wetlands of Honduras. WATCH VIDEO

Singer: Mangrove poisoning update
OnekahakahaDead3The lawsuit filed against Malama o Puna et al for poisoning mangroves at Pohoiki, Vacation land (Wai Opae), Onekahakaha Beach Park in Hilo, and Paki Bay is still in the courts. Here is an update. Background: Malama o Puna has dedicated itself to the complete eradication of mangroves from the Big Island. They experimented at Wai Opae with a new, cheap method of eradicating mangroves, using herbicide to kill the trees and leave them to rot in place. The poisoning of about 20 acres at Wai Opae was done in 2008. READ MORE

SOUTH PACIFIC

Climate ‘driver of extinction’
unsw_-_mangroveAUSTRALIA – Climate change this century is expected to place substantial strain on the integrity and survival of some of the world’s biologically important conservation regions, with most experiencing monthly climate conditions that were considered extreme in the recent past, says a new study. Within the next 60 years, almost all of the Global 200 “ecoregions” – those selected for priority conservation for their irreplaceability or distinctiveness – will experience extreme monthly temperatures with a local warming of up to 2 °C, the study has found. Tropical and subtropical ecoregions – including some in northern Australia – and mangroves face extreme conditions earliest, with those in Africa and South America thought to be particularly vulnerable to even relatively small temperature increases, according to a report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. READ MORE

New book highlights global mangrove destruction
41O92A2BsQL._SL500_AA300_NEW ZEALAND- Author Kennedy Warne’s new book, released Feb 1, 2011, titled “Let Them Eat Shrimp: The Tragic Disappearance of the Rainforests of the Sea” tries to shed light on the connection between mangroves and the seafood consumers find on their plate. Warne takes readers into the muddy battle zone that is the mangrove forest. A tangle of snaking roots and twisted trunks, mangroves are often dismissed as foul wastelands. In fact, they are supermarkets of the sea, providing shellfish, honey, timber, and charcoal to coastal communities from New Zealandto South Americato Florida. A longtime journalist, Warne captures the insatiability of the seafood industries and the magic of the mangroves. PURCHASE BOOK

THE LAST WORD

Writer Tom Butler responded to our last issue of MAP News with these comments.

Tim Murray’s essay1 “What If We Stopped Fighting for Preservation and Fought Economic Growth Instead?” is provocative for sure. Murray is a compelling writer, and I admire his unflinching focus on the root causes of ecological collapse including human overpopulation, consumerism, mass migration, and the religion of endless growth. He’ll get no argument from me about these factors as systemic drivers of biodiversity loss, and I share his frustration that many reform-minded environmentalists and large NGOs are unwilling to address the fundamental contradiction between wild nature’s flourishing and the intrinsic logic of a techno-industrial growth society based on corporate capitalism. But for Murray to turn his wrath on protected areas, and suggest that preserving places for wildlife and wild processes to proceed unmolested is futile or even counterproductive as a conservation strategy, is a dangerously misguided idea. I hope it will be rejected by everyone who cares about the health of the biosphere. READ MORE

~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS

If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com
{/PARA}

The MAP News, 255th Ed., 22 January 2011

{PARA}
Dear Friends,
This is the 255th Edition of the Mangrove Action Project News, January 22, 2011.

For the Mangroves,
Alfredo Quarto
Mangrove Action Project

MAP’s Mission

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

DONATE TO MAP

MAP depends on your support in order to produce this e-bulletin and all that we do. Please visit our website and consider donating to MAP today. It is easy to give a one-time donation, or to set up monthly recurring donations via PayPal or Network for Good!

SHRIMP LESS, THINK MORE campaign has changed it’s name to QUESTION YOUR SHRIMP:

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog.
Join MAP on Facebook
Sign the Consumer’s Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

Action Alerts:

URGENT ACTION ALERT!!!

Save the Sundarbans Campaign!
Stop The Phulbari Coal Mine Disaster Before It Happens! TAKE ACTION NOW

Volunteer Needed For MAP
MAP/Asia Coordinator requires office assistance to support a wide range of projects activities.
VIEW JOB DESCRIPTION

Funding limitations threaten MAP’s programs
Let’s join together now to Save the Mangroves! Donate $25 or more to receive a beautiful Children’s Mangrove Art Calendar for 2011! Please also consider ordering MAP’s beautiful calendars today, they make excellent gifts for the upcoming new year, while helping a great cause in the process! READ MORE

Come Teach a Man to Fish
Learn about Sustainable Seafood and see what we’re cooking!

Join the discussion on sustainable gourmet foods
Click Here

Serious Threats to the Sea Turtles
Take Action to Protect India’s Ancient Olive Ridley Population
1) Click here to add your name to a petition opposing the POSCO port in Orissa.
2) Click here to donate to support STRP’s international efforts to protect sea turtles.

Rethinking Plastics Campaign
We’re addicted to plastic, especially plastic bags. If you are like 95% of US shoppers, whenever you purchase anything, it ends up in a plastic bag. Join the Campaign. Sign up for our Plastics Newsletter ALSO View Video

India’s Ports Approved in Sensitive Mangrove Areas
TATA receives fast tracking; take our poll and tell us why environmental concerns were overlooked TELL US

World Atlas of Mangroves donates 10% of purchase price to Mangrove Action Project LEARN MORE

Help with Kenya Ports Write to leaders

Don’t Let Experimental Genetically Engineered Salmon Reach Your Plate
Take action to keep genetically engineered salmon out of the U.S.CLICK HERE

Urgent Appeal to all wildlife and nature protection organizations in the world
Stop Saudi destruction of mangroves and tideflats. WRITE TO OFFICIALS

Borneo: Stop the company from stealing our forests!
The indigenous people of Western Kalimantan(Borneo) are fighting against deforestation for four years. The Indonesian government as well as the company clearing their forest have ignored the demands of the Dayak communities so far. Now, they need international support. Please help by TAKING ACTION NOW

Action Alert: Papua New Guinea – Don’t Dump Poisons into the Sea!
The government of Papua New Guinea doesn’t want to hear from us. It has authorized a Chinese mining company to dump toxic waste into the sea, and it is determined to stifle dissent from every quarter.

JAMAICA’S FONT HILL
Save Font Hill Nature Preserve from development. Please Sign our Petition

MAP ISSUES

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO

Note from MAP Executive Director

Dear Friends,
MAP has recently helped launch a global movement, “Save the Sundarbans Campaign”, and one of our first joint efforts is to halt the disastrous plan for the Phulbari Coal Mine. Please read the following article and use the sample letter as a model for your own, sending these to the attached list of targeted officials and cc to others listed. Hopefully, our united effort will help us put a halt to this terrible mining disaster before it gets underground!
Cheers,
Alfredo Quarto
Exec. Director

FEATURED SECTION

U.S. Pushed to Reopen Bangladesh Coal Mine Closed by Violent Protests
screen_shot_2010-12-22_at_10.44.39_amBANGLADESH – US diplomats privately pressured the Bangladeshi government into reinstating a controversial coal mine which had been closed following violent protests a leaked diplomatic cable shows. The government of Bangladesh has not yet given any firm assurances over whether they will give the coal mine project the go-ahead. It remains a deeply contentious issue, with activists fearing the country’s natural resources are due to be sold off to a string of foreign investors. READ MORE

URGENT ACTION ALERT!!!

Save the Sundarbans!
Stop The Phulbari Coal Mine Disaster Before It Happens! TAKE ACTION NOW

AFRICA

Dania Beach monkeys endangered, wildlife officials warn
They come out, about 2 p.m. each day, and help themselves to the bananas and mangoes left for them in a basket attached to a fence behind Motel 6 in Dania Beach. At one time, they used to pelt gawkers with the fruit. But times are tough, even for the troops of long-tailed African monkeys who have lived in the mangroves of Dania Beach for the past 50 years. At one time about 100 monkeys roamed the mangroves, often venturing into visible places that sometimes dazzled and sometimes frightened visitors. Now there are less than 20. READ MORE

ASIA

U.S. Pushed to Reopen Bangladesh Coal Mine Closed by Violent Protests
BANGLADESH – US diplomats privately pressured the Bangladeshi government into reinstating a controversial coal mine which had been closed following violent protests a leaked diplomatic cable shows. The government of Bangladesh has not yet given any firm assurances over whether they will give the coal mine project the go-ahead. It remains a deeply contentious issue, with activists fearing the country’s natural resources are due to be sold off to a string of foreign investors. READ MORE

Sharing power – the end of ‘fortress’ conservation?
Will conservation organizations finally take practical action to implement agreed commitments that recognize the rights of indigenous peoples in protected areas? Over the last 10 years governments and conservation organizations have made significant commitments to uphold the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities in protected area policies and activities. However, on the ground, the impoverishment of indigenous peoples and the displacement from their ancestral homelands due to protected areas are still the hidden costs of conservation. Despite indigenous peoples gaining increasing recognition as the guardians of forests, wetlands, seas and other ecosystems they depend on, they continue to be left out of many conservation organizations’ discussions and projects concerned with preventing biodiversity loss and saving charismatic species and habitats. READ MORE

Sri Lanka: A million hit by island’s worst crisis since tsunami
Sri Lanka is battling to confront wide scale monsoon flooding that has affected more than one million people and which the government says is second only to the 2004 tsunami in terms of the devastation it has caused. Around 30,000 troops are struggling to get aid and emergency supplies to the worst-hit areas in the country’s centre and east, where up to 325,000 people have been forced from their homes. So far, the death toll stands at 23. “The situation here is quite terrible,” said S Raguraamamurty, a coordinator with the charity Oxfam. “We are facing immense challenges. An immediate priority is getting food and drinking water to people.” The government yesterday said it would send pregnant women and young children to hospital as a preventive measure amid concerns that waterborne diseases could spread. READ MORE

Scientist release findings on biodiversity of crabs in Karwar mangrove environment west coast of India
INDIA – The distribution of crabs in Karwar was recorded from October 2007 to July 2008. At monthly intervals, the species present on the subs tram and on the vegetation area were recorded in quadrant each measuring 1meter square. There are about 15 crabs species are distributed in karwar mangrove environment. Crabs belonging to the family Grapsidae and Ocypodidae are most dominant forms. Substrate suitability, effects of tidal inundation and distribution of mangrove plants were the possible factors that could influence zonation and abundance of the crabs in the Karwar mangroves. READ MORE

2010 saw massive coral bleaching in Andamans
INDIA – Rising sea surface temperatures due to global warming caused extensive coral bleaching in some of the Andaman & Nicobar Islands in 2010, which, according to a scientist, is the severest in over a decade. Scientists from Marine Research Laboratory, Central Agriculture Research Institute in Port Blair and Regional Remote Sensing Centre in Nagpur, which is under the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), conducted a study to assess the extent of bleaching during 2010 at selected reef sites in the islands. Bleaching is one of the major threats which has significantly affected the reefs across the globe during different time-periods. Coral reefs form some of the most diverse ecosystems on earth and are home to over 25 percent of all marine species in the sea. READ MORE

Scientists object to Xayaburi hydropower project
VIETNAM – Vietnam scientists expressed their objection to the project to build Xayaburi hydropower plant on the Mekong River in Laos, saying the plant would adversely affect the livelihood of millions of people downstream in Vietnam. Scientists, who gathered at a meeting organized in Can Tho City, said that if Laos builds the 1,260-MW hydropower plant on the upper reach of the Mekong River, the livelihood of millions of people in Vietnam’s Mekong Delta would be at stake. They explained that the water flow will dwindle and salt intrusion will increase, leading to the reduction of annual output of agriculture and aquatic products. READ MORE

Deep water ports slated in mangrove region
BURMA – Officials in Burma and Thailand are planning to develop a new deepwater port near Dawei, a port city in the Taninthanyi division, south of Rangoon. In November, an initial agreement was signed between the Burmese authorities and a joint Italian-Thai company. As things stand, this and related projects are to be completed in three phases over the course of a decade, at a cost of USD 13 billion. The project is part of a larger plan to set up a full-fledged industrial zone around Dawei, the first such in Burma. Not everyone is enthusiastic about the news, however. Media reports state that villagers near Dawei were asked by the junta to leave their lands and relocate, without any talk of compensation. In addition, Burma’s lax anti-pollution laws would seem to ensure that foreign companies will have a free hand within the new 250-sq-km industrial zone. READ MORE

Fishermen in Orissa, India, oppose more olive ridley sanctuaries
INDIA – Orissa indigenous fishermen and fish workers and wildlife activists have strongly opposed government proposals to set up two more marine sanctuaries at Rushikulya and Devi river mouth areas of Ganjam and Puri districts respectively. Opposing the government’s stand, Orissa Traditional Fish Workers’ Union (OTFWU), members of the union claimed it would affect the livelihood of thousands of local fishermen who depend on the sea. “Thousands of fishermen, who depend on the sea for their livelihood, will be affected, if the proposed marine sanctuaries came up,” said general secretary of OTFWU K Alleya. The aim for setting up of the two marine sanctuaries is to provide legal protection to the endangered Olive Ridley turtles. READ MORE

Indian fisherfolks defy authorities; demolish illegal prawn farms
INDIA – In what appeared to be a direct challenge to the authorities, hundreds of traditional Indian fishermen on Thursday entered into the Chilika lake, Asia’s largest brackish water lagoon and a Ramsar site, located in the State of Orissa, and demolished a number of illegal prawn gheries (farms) raised by influential politicians, bureaucrats, mafia and anti-socials. The fishermen have further vowed to intensify the demolition drive on Friday also. The agitated fisher folks, who entirely depend on Chilika for their livelihood, took the extreme step after their 48-hour deadline to the state government to clear all the illegal gheries came to an end this morning. The lake has become one vast prawn farm in the state and has achieved the dubious distinction of being the largest illegal aquaculture complex in the world. READ MORE

Dive closures don’t go far enough: conservationist
20110122.150029_110122-coralTHAILAND – The founder of the For Sea Foundation (FSF) is urging authorities to close dive sites in more national marine parks on the Andaman Sea, claiming the recent closure of 18 sites in seven parks does not go far enough. The National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department on Thursday announced the measure, which is intended to allow coral reefs bleached by high sea temperatures time to recover. But in an article titled “Coral Bleaching: Stop Damage and Recover the Rest”, FSF founder and Prime Minister’s Office secretary Vittayen Muttamara wrote that scientific studies had identified more sites in the Andaman that had been severely damaged by bleaching. READ MORE

NORTH AMERICA

MAP’s Education Direction Recognized by RAMSAR
MEXICO – Celebrating its 40th anniversary in protection of world biological diversity the Government of Mexico and the Ramsar Secretariat are organizing the celebration in the Americas, which will take place in the city of Huatulco, Mexico from January 31st to February 2nd 2011. The main objective of this celebration is to raise awareness among stakeholders on the achievements and importance of the Ramsar Convention in the Americas during its 40 years trajectory, emphasizing on the conservation and wise use of wetlands in the region. MAPs’ Education Director, Martin Keeley has been invited to prepare a presentation on his education work in the Caribbean. READ MORE

Researcher spots rare birds in Honduran mangroves
ClapperRailHONDURAS – Robert Gallardo has lived in four regions of Honduras since early 1993 and has personally seen close to 650 bird species in Honduras and added 17 new records. On a recent excursion to the wetlands of southern Honduras, researchers Gallardo and Mayron Mejia discovered two more rare species among this biodiverse region of mangrove waterways. Sightings included an immature Heermann`s Gull and a pair of Clapper Rails. Gallardo described it as “an incredible find for it is very rare along the Pacific coast of Central America.” READ MORE or VISIT BIRDSOFHONDURAS.COM

Saving Mexico’s Parrots and Mangroves
Habitat loss in Mexico is negatively affecting parrots that thrive in tropical and mountain forests, but there is also a more sinister culprit for the decline of many species. A large number of parrots are sold each year as part of an illegal pet trade both within Mexico and internationally. According to a comprehensive report published by Defenders in 2007, an estimated 65,000 to 78,500 parrots are trapped illegally each year. That’s why Mexico’s 22 species of parrots and macaws are in serious trouble. Though Mexican authorities have monitored the situation for years, enforcement is difficult and often given very low priority. READ MORE

Mangrove habitat under threat
MEXICO – The scenery is almost postcard perfect: a tiny beach nestled in a cove and surrounded by a lively mangrove forest ecosystem. But local fisherman Bulfrano Castillo is worried; major hotels are rising up around the beach, and the owners are telling local people to scram. “They can’t just kick us out,” Castillo says, standing beside his boat. “We pay our taxes and have everything in order.” Hotel construction in this cove began two years ago and Castillo says the new resorts are damaging the mangrove ecosystem and hurting fish populations, Al Jazeera reported recently. “Everything used to be really green, there were deer and iguanas but now a lot of the trees and animals are gone,” he says. “At night the construction site has lights, so the fish don’t come near and the workers throw things into the sea.” READ MORE

Corals are thriving in a unique habitat.
U.S.A. – The name Hurricane Hole might conjure images of howling winds and crashing seas. In fact, this collection of bays on the southern shore of St. John, in the U.S. Virgin Islands, is a sheltered sanctuary whose crystalline waters offer safe haven for young fish. It also protects an incredibly diverse coral habitat. Dominated by red mangrove trees, its shores are lined by a forest of tangled roots. Abundant corals, most of them colorful and healthy, cling to the roots. “The fact that 30 of the Caribbean’s 45 coral species live in Hurricane Hole is incredible,” says Caroline Rogers, a U.S. Geological Survey scientist who recently discovered the high coral diversity. “You wouldn’t expect them to do that well when shallow waters get so warm.” The mangrove corals survived in late 2005 and 2006 when more than 60 percent of coral in the Virgin Islands died. A heat wave raised local water temperatures by about a degree, followed by a disease outbreak. Corals are so sensitive that small temperature increases can push them over the edge. Large brain corals (above) were especially hard hit, and only a few survive offshore today. Yet they’re plentiful in Hurricane Hole. READ MORE

Mexican government urged to undertake scientific study of dangers of building structures atop mangrove soils
MEXICO – Close attention must be paid to an overwhelming issue concerning mangrove destruction along the coastline of Quintana Roo. Seemingly endless developments are being constructed on mangrove habitats causing an explosive impact on their surroundings. On November 16th, 2010, The Princess Hotels and Resorts released an acknowledgment letter concerning the explosions that occurred underneath their hotels (Chilcott 2010). This letter documented that there is an undetermined cause to the explosions and that ¨Mexican authorities¨ are still currently investigating how five tourists and two employees died due to this explosion (Princess 2010). The blasts were big enough to leave a crater three feet deep in the ground, suck the air out of the thatched roof buildings, blow out windows of the hotel, wound and hospitalize employees and tourists that were impaled with shards of glass (Alococer 2010). It appears as though owners of these hotels were either unaware or neglected to take into consideration the potential for pressurized methane gas stored in mangrove habitats to explode. READ MORE

SOUTH PACIFIC

Floodwater threatens overwhelming damage to Great Barrier Reef
AUSTRALIA – Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, one of the ecological wonders of the world, may also be severely affected by the Queensland floods. The pristine waters of the vast 1,400-mile reef system, home to thousands of exotic and often endangered marine species, from whales and dolphins, seabirds and tropical fish to tiny coral polyps, are threatened by huge volumes of polluted floodwater flowing out from the coast. READ MORE

FINAL THOUGHT

What If We Stopped Fighting for Preservation and Fought Economic Growth Instead?
U.S.A. – Each time environmentalists rally to defend an endangered habitat, and finally win the battle to designate it as a park “forever,” as Nature Conservancy puts it, the economic growth machine turns to surrounding lands and exploits them ever more intensively, causing more species loss than ever before, putting even more lands under threat. For each acre of land that comes under protection, two acres are developed, and 40% of all species lie outside of parks. Nature Conservancy Canada may indeed have “saved” – at least for now – two million acres, but many more millions have been ruined. And the ruin continues, until, once more, on a dozen other fronts, development comes knocking at the door of a forest, or a marsh or a valley that many hold sacred. READ MORE

~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS

If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com
{/PARA}

The MAP News, 254th Ed., 08 January 2011

{PARA}
Dear Friends,
This is the 254th Edition of the Mangrove Action Project News, January 8, 2011.

For the Mangroves,
Alfredo Quarto
Mangrove Action Project

MAP’s Mission

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

DONATE TO MAP

MAP depends on your support in order to produce this e-bulletin and all that we do. Please visit our website and consider donating to MAP today. It is easy to give a one-time donation, or to set up monthly recurring donations via PayPal or Network for Good!

SHRIMP LESS, THINK MORE campaign has changed it’s name to QUESTION YOUR SHRIMP:

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog.
Join MAP on Facebook
Sign the Consumer’s Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

Action Alerts:

Stop Sea Plane Project in Negombo Lagoon – SRI LANKA
PLEASE RESPOND BEFORE JAN 20th
Negombo Lagoon (on west coast of Sri Lanka, approximately 37 km from the capital, Colombo) is being dredged and excavated for the Sea Plane Project which endangers the livelihood of about 15,000 local people and the maritime ecology. TAKE ACTION

Funding limitations threaten MAP’s programs
Let’s join together now to Save the Mangroves! Donate $25 or more to receive a beautiful Children’s Mangrove Art Calendar for 2011! Please also consider ordering MAP’s beautiful calendars today, they make excellent gifts for the upcoming new year, while helping a great cause in the process! READ MORE

Come Teach a Man to Fish
Learn about Sustainable Seafood and see what we’re cooking!

Join the discussion on sustainable gourmet foods
Click Here

Serious Threats to the Sea Turtles
Take Action to Protect India’s Ancient Olive Ridley Population
1) Click here to add your name to a petition opposing the POSCO port in Orissa.
2) Click here to donate to support STRP’s international efforts to protect sea turtles.

Rethinking Plastics Campaign
We’re addicted to plastic, especially plastic bags. If you are like 95% of US shoppers, whenever you purchase anything, it ends up in a plastic bag. Join the Campaign. Sign up for our Plastics Newsletter ALSO View Video

India’s Ports Approved in Sensitive Mangrove Areas
TATA receives fast tracking; take our poll and tell us why environmental concerns were overlooked TELL US

World Atlas of Mangroves donates 10% of purchase price to Mangrove Action Project LEARN MORE

Help with Kenya Ports Write to leaders

Don’t Let Experimental Genetically Engineered Salmon Reach Your Plate
Take action to keep genetically engineered salmon out of the U.S.CLICK HERE

Urgent Appeal to all wildlife and nature protection organizations in the world
Stop Saudi destruction of mangroves and tideflats. WRITE TO OFFICIALS

Borneo: Stop the company from stealing our forests!
The indigenous people of Western Kalimantan(Borneo) are fighting against deforestation for four years. The Indonesian government as well as the company clearing their forest have ignored the demands of the Dayak communities so far. Now, they need international support. Please help by TAKING ACTION NOW

Action Alert: Papua New Guinea – Don’t Dump Poisons into the Sea!
The government of Papua New Guinea doesn’t want to hear from us. It has authorized a Chinese mining company to dump toxic waste into the sea, and it is determined to stifle dissent from every quarter.

JAMAICA’S FONT HILL
Save Font Hill Nature Preserve from development. Please Sign our Petition

MAP ISSUES

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO

FEATURED SECTION

MAP’s Exec Dir Visits Thailand
Alfredo_in_Thailand_2011While in Thailand for an international workshop concerning the certification of aquaculture-raised shrimp, MAP’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto took the opportunity to visit several non-MAP mangrove sites. Joining Alfredo Quarto for the mangrove tour were Jim Enright, MAP Asia Regional Coordinator, Jaruwan Kaewmahanin Enright, MAP Thailand Field Project Coordinator, Shannon Alexander, MAP Asia Volunteer Intern, Jamie Machin, Senior Mangrove Ecologist for the independent company DHI Singapore, and Gudrun Hubendick, of various Swedish organizations including the NGO the Swedish Society for Nature Conservation (SSNC). READ MORE

NEWS AROUND THE WORLD

ASIA

Editors Note – Reader response to our action alerts may very well have to do with the following story! Please continue to remain active in protecting our global heritage of mangroves. Your efforts do pay off!

Showcause notice given for Mundra port for damaging the coast
INDIA – The Mundra Port and Special Economic Zone, an infrastructure project owned by one of India biggest corporate houses – the Adani group, has been slapped with a showcause notice by the environment ministry for serious violations of the Coastal Regulation Zone notification. The Jairam Ramesh – led environment ministry issued the notice based on the complaint of a local NGO asking the Adani group as to why the clearance for the project should not be canceled. The Mundra Port is said to be India’s answer to Rotterdam. However the question is at what cost? A year and a half ago, NDTV had exposed how hundreds of mangroves had been hacked and destroyed. Today the scenario is perhaps grimmer, with many more mangroves simply disappearing. READ MORE

Locals fight to preserve Phuket mangroves
phuket-1-mjaaogrTHAILAND- Out of fear of losing their community and way of life to “selfish people” allegedly encroaching on protected mangrove forests, Pa Khlok villagers submitted a formal complaint to the Phuket governor on January 5, 2011. About 20 villagers, led by chief Cha-euan Hemhong and community leader “Uncle” Jurun Ratchapol, handed the letter to Gov Tri Augkaradacha requesting immediate investigation into the matter. The land in question is between the Phuket Home for the Elderly and the Phuket Airpark. It is currently in the process of being transferred from protected forest department land to “community forest”, which would allow local villagers to collectively manage and use the land for their benefit. This transition would delegate land preservation responsibilities to the local community while simultaneously allowing them to benefit from having access to it. However, it appears someone is trying to beat the villagers to the punch. They claim that intruders have been clearing the land, little-by-little, and planting coconut trees to convert the area to agricultural land to be sold in the future. READ MORE

Sea Plane Project Threatens Sri Lanka Livelihood
SRI LANKA– Negombo Lagoon (on west coast of Sri Lanka, approximately 37 km from the capital, Colombo) is being dredged and excavated for the Sea Plane Project which endangers the livelihood of about 15,000 local people and the maritime ecology. Although the Minister of Port and Aviation claimed that the Sea Plane Project would bring no destruction to Negombo Lagoon, dredging process of the Lagoon started at the end of November, without proper procedure such as Environmental Impact Assessment and consultation with the affected people. On 17 November 2010, fishermen association and human rights activists organized a protest against the damage of Negombo Lagoon, with participation of around 1,000 protestors, including fishermen, religious leaders and human rights workers. Although the construction of the sea plane landing port has been halted, it is temporary only. On 18 November 2010, Defense Minister Gotabaya Rajapaksa, the president’s younger brother, expressed that he could have ordered Navy to disperse the crowd. He added that the government would continue the construction “at any cost”. READ MORE

Pulau Balang Brigde gets closure to completion
INDONESIA – The Pulau Balang Bridge project, which represents the principal threat to the valuable ecosystems of Balikpapan Bay and Sungai Wain Protection Forests, is getting alarmingly close to its realization – regardless the fact that there are feasible and even more economical alternatives, which would not harm the environment – at least not in such a huge scale as the Pulau Balang Bridge project. As the situation becomes acute, Environmentalist Stan Lhota has compiled some media releases on this issue, in order to keep all environmentalists aware of recent developments. READ MORE

India’s Coastal Regulation Zone Act finalized
The Union Ministry for Environment and Forests has finalized the key Coastal Regulation Zone 2011 Act and it will be announced soon. The Act has been finalized after a series of detailed discussions with various organizations of fishermen throughout the country, a press release issued by the Ministry. “The suggestions made by these fishermen organizations have been incorporated in the new notification. The most important benefit from CRZ 2011 for fishermen is that a number of development activities, like fishing jetty, fish drying yards, net mending yards, fish processing by traditional methods, boat building yards, ice plants, boat repairs etc shall be permitted also in the “no-development zone,” the statement said. Further, the “no-development zone” shall be reduced to 100 metres from the high tide line from the existing 200 metres for providing housing for traditional fishing communities, it added. READ MORE

Half of India’s mangrove forests heavily damaged
INDONESIA – Half of Indonesia`s mangrove forests are heavily damaged and facing total destruction due to ecological problems, one expert says. Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB) mangrove expert Professor Cecep Kusmana said most of Indonesia`s mangrove forests were in critical condition because of ecological disturbances. Cecep hoped the government, the Forestry Ministry in particular, would undertake an emergency response to save the mangrove forests as they were on the brink of complete destruction. “The threat to our mangrove forests is very concerning and they will vanish if we don’t act now,” Cecep said. The precarious conditions of the country’s mangrove forests needed to be addressed through serious actions by the central government, the Forestry Ministry and all stakeholders, he said. The governments of regions where the mangroves were located also had an important role to play in saving them as they were the local policy makers. READ MORE

Failure of coastal management in the Philippines
PHILIPPINES– A new study released shows how the environmental efforts aimed at a balanced state of coastal ecosystems can be undermined in the face of diverging stakeholder agendas. Some shareholders may be disempowered by the incoherence between the area’s policy makers’ worldview and reality, paving the way for unethical influence from elite alliances. This is coupled with a deepening of the dominance of state, international development banks, foreign aid agencies, and NGOs in promoting their respective interests. In localities such as the Babuyan Islands, Philippines, when assumptions of integrated coastal management collapse, it has destructive consequences for fisherfolk and the coastal environment. READ REPORT

Xiamento build MangroveParkin HaicangBayto protect ecosystem
9605_1CHINA- The dredging project of HaicangBayis progressing smoothly and a MangroveParkwill be built upon its completion, according to the Construction Centre of Haicang Bay, Xiamen. The dredging project covers a sea area of 6.66 square kilometers, with Songyu Ferry Terminal in the south and HaicangBridgein the north, Haicang Avenuein the west and Huoshaoyu Islet, Datu Islet, Xiaotu Islet and Dayu Islet in the east. Currently, the daily quantity of dredging that has been dug out is about 10,000 cubic meters. The project is expected to completed by the end of 2011. READ MORE

Give fishermen land ownership rights, says India’s minister
INDIA- India’s agriculture minister Sharad Pawar on Sunday asked the state government to give land ownership rights to the fishermen who have been staying on the coastline for centuries. “The problem of koliwadas (fishermen villages) is very serious. They have been staying there for centuries. The people have their ancestral houses on the land which is owned by the government,” he said speaking at the inauguration of a three-day National Fish Festival in Bandra-Kurla Complex on Sunday morning. He said the ownership issue was not that difficult to resolve at the government level. “The poor fishermen’s families will get their long dues if we give them the land ownership.” Chief minister Prithviraj Chavan, who was also present, did not comment on Pawar’s demand. Pawar also lamented that Maharashtrahad registered negative growth rate in fish production and asked the state government to fish production by making certain policy changes. READ MORE

High Court adjourns hearing on Dahisar mangroves
INDIA- The Supreme Court on Tuesday adjourned the hearing of a case regarding the destruction of mangroves in Dahisar. Ravi Builder’s counsel, senior lawyer Ram Jethmalani, sought an adjournment seeking more time to file a reply. “The builder wanted more time to file a reply to the report submitted by judge ML Tahilyani. The report notes the destruction of mangroves and other environmental violations,” said Harish Pandey, member of New Link Road Residents Forum, one of the petitioners. The report was submitted to the apex court on December 15 by principal judge of the sessions court, ML Tahilyani. It pointed out environmental violations by Ravi Builders, who had been allowed to repair a bund in the area on the condition that mangroves would not be destroyed. The next hearing of the case is on January 10. READ MORE

Nat Geo lists Palawanamong the best destinations of 2011
PHILIPPINES– Editors of the world-renowned National Geographic Traveler have listed Palawanin the Philippines among the “20 Best Trips of 2011.” They lauded the largest province in country for its “limestone karst cliffs, coral atolls, mangrove forests, sugar-white sandy beaches, and extensive fringing reefs [that] create one of the Philippines’ most biodiverse terrestrial and marine environments.” Top spots of Palawan were also highlighted in the National Geographic website. READ MORE

EUROPE

Study backs community management to save world’s fisheries
FRANCE- A study by marine scientists has given powerful backing to campaigners who say the future of many of the world’s fisheries lies in co-management by government, local people and fishermen. Publishing in the science journal Nature on Wednesday, researchers said the traditional “top-down” approach — trawling quotas set down and policed by central authorities — was failing in many fisheries as rules were often poorly implemented or abused. The best-managed fisheries are those that bring together local representatives and fishermen who co-determine how the resources should be managed and enforce these decisions effectively, they said. “They have very strong, cohesive communities with strong leaders,” Nicolas Gutierrez, a Universityof Washington fishery scientist, who headed the paper, told AFP. One billion people depend on fish or shellfish as their primary source of protein, but a third of fish stocks worldwide are overexploited or depleted, according to figures cited in the study. READ MORE

NORTH AMERICA

Mexican hotel blast likely due to broken gas line
MEXICO2nw15_1007681cl-3MEXICO- Prosecutors say new evidence suggests a gas-line leak probably caused the Nov. 14 explosion that killed five Canadians and two Mexicans at a hotel on Mexico’s Caribbean coast. Officials had earlier said an accumulation of swamp or sewage gas may have fueled the blast. Mr. Alor said Tuesday that those may have contributed, but the heating-gas line appears to be the main culprit and may have been set off by a spark from an electric switch or plug. READ MORE

SOUTH PACIFIC

Mangrove removal resumes
110106_mangroveNEW ZEALAND- Mechanical mangrove mulching resumes around the Tauranga harbour this month after taking a five month break for the bird nesting season. Mulching is scheduled to resume on January 19 in the Waimapu estuary before moving to Welcome Baya nd then the Wainui Estuary at the end of Morton Prestige Road. Approximately 80 hectares of mangroves have been removed from Tauranga harbour fringes to date with about another 30 hectares to go on the remaining sites. The consents to remove the mangroves are held by 10 estuary care community groups. “Prior to council assisting this process with a special machine, the care groups were completing this arduous task by hand,” says Bayof Plenty Regional Council estuary care officer Braden Rowson. “A wide tracked digger with a mulching unit attached is now being used to clear the mangroves. “The machine exerts approximately 2 psi ground pressure – significantly less than a human footprint,” says Braden. “It’s been a very big learning curve for us this last year. READ MORE

~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS

If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com
{/PARA}

The MAP News, 253rd Ed., 25 December 2010

{PARA}
Dear Friends,
This is the 253rd Edition of the Mangrove Action Project News, December 25, 2010.

For the Mangroves,
Alfredo Quarto
Mangrove Action Project

MAP’s Mission

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

DONATE TO MAP

MAP depends on your support in order to produce this e-bulletin and all that we do. Please visit our website and consider donating to MAP today. It is easy to give a one-time donation, or to set up monthly recurring donations via PayPal or Network for Good!

SHRIMP LESS, THINK MORE campaign has changed it’s name to QUESTION YOUR SHRIMP:

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog.
Join MAP on Facebook
Sign the Consumer’s Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

Action Alerts:

MAP needs to raise $10,000 to support our global field projects. Donations submitted by December 31, 2010, will be matched by one of our sponsors. Donate today and double your impact

Funding limitations threaten MAP’s programs
Let’s join together now to Save the Mangroves! Donate $25 or more to receive a beautiful Children’s Mangrove Art Calendar for 2011! Please also consider ordering MAP’s beautiful calendars today, they make excellent gifts for the upcoming new year, while helping a great cause in the process! READ MORE

Come Teach a Man to Fish
Learn about Sustainable Seafood and see what we’re cooking!

Join the discussion on sustainable gourmet foods
Click Here

Serious Threats to the Sea Turtles
Take Action to Protect India’s Ancient Olive Ridley Population
1) Click here to add your name to a petition opposing the POSCO port in Orissa.
2) Click here to donate to support STRP’s international efforts to protect sea turtles.

Rethinking Plastics Campaign
We’re addicted to plastic, especially plastic bags. If you are like 95% of US shoppers, whenever you purchase anything, it ends up in a plastic bag. Join the Campaign. Sign up for our Plastics Newsletter ALSO View Video

Mangrove Ecology, Management and Restoration Workshop
Registration of the 2011 “Mangrove Ecology, Management and Restoration Workshop” will close on Jan 1, 2011. Read More.

India’s Ports Approved in Sensitive Mangrove Areas
TATA receives fast tracking; take our poll and tell us why environmental concerns were overlooked TELL US

World Atlas of Mangroves donates 10% of purchase price to Mangrove Action Project LEARN MORE

Help with Kenya Ports Write to leaders

Don’t Let Experimental Genetically Engineered Salmon Reach Your Plate
Take action to keep genetically engineered salmon out of the U.S.CLICK HERE

Urgent Appeal to all wildlife and nature protection organizations in the world
Stop Saudi destruction of mangroves and tideflats. WRITE TO OFFICIALS

Borneo: Stop the company from stealing our forests!
The indigenous people of Western Kalimantan(Borneo) are fighting against deforestation for four years. The Indonesian government as well as the company clearing their forest have ignored the demands of the Dayak communities so far. Now, they need international support. Please help by TAKING ACTION NOW

Action Alert: Papua New Guinea – Don’t Dump Poisons into the Sea!
The government of Papua New Guinea doesn’t want to hear from us. It has authorized a Chinese mining company to dump toxic waste into the sea, and it is determined to stifle dissent from every quarter.

JAMAICA’S FONT HILL
Save Font Hill Nature Preserve from development. Please Sign our Petition

MAP ISSUES

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO

FEATURED SECTION

Holiday Greetings from MAP
Dear MAP News Subscribers,
Merry Christmas and Season’s Greetings from us at Mangrove Action Project!Christmas is a celebration of birth. In today’s world we should be committing ourselves to a rebirth perhaps … a rebirth of our planet’s health and biodiversity, a rebirth of our commitment to the mangroves and our oceans, a rebirth of our commitment to peace and justice.

In this world of diminishing biodiversity and ongoing deforestation, we need to re-green our planet by restoring our forested areas back to health, including the mangroves which line our coastal regions and protect and enrich our livers in so many ways. This end of the year should inspire new beginnings and new hope for the future. Let’s take a New Year’s resolution for the mangroves, and work together to halt further mangrove losses and to restore 1% of mangroves per year thus reversing the current rate of loss. This can be our goal for 2011! Help MAP give birth to this new idea end end this old year with renewed hope and commitment for the future!

For A Future With Mangroves,
Alfredo Quarto,
Executive Director
MAP

FEATURED STORY

Project offers “click to plant a mangrove”
23treeINDIA- Grow-Trees.com has launched a project to plant 50,000 mangrove saplings in the famous Rukhmani temple creek site at Dwarka in Gujarat. The project aims to restore the mangrove cover on 50 acres of inter-tidal mud flats. Members of the local communities have been trained in mangrove nursery practices and saplings of the ‘Avicennia marina’ mangrove species are ready for plantation. The project in association with Tata Chemicals is aimed at restoring the ecological balance in the coastal areas of this region. Dwarka has been submerged six times in its history and restoring mangroves will help protect the coastline and the environment. Mangroves play an important role in filtering land run-off and controlling coastal erosion; they regulate flooding and act as sinks for absorbing pollutants discharged into the sea. Launched on World Environment Day (June 5, 2010), Grow-Trees has planted 52,000 trees in other areas so far. READ MORE

AFRICA

Climate change: Scientists urge conservation of Africa’s forest
NIGERIA- In a bid to reduce the severity of climate change, scientists have called for the preservation of Africa’s surviving tropical forests and planting new trees to replace those lost to deforestation. They added that the forests ease the local impact of climate change by absorbing more carbon from the air and by regulating local weather conditions. They also cited the forests’ roles as watersheds, defenses against soil erosion and conservation pools for biodiversity. During the 2010 Open Day of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), which was marked with the planting of indigenous trees by institutes’ workers in Ibadan, the Manager of the IITA – Leventis Foundation Project, Dr. John Peacock, said that reforestation and education on the benefits of conservation were critical to stemming and reclaiming Africa’s lost forest and biodiversity. READ MORE

ASIA

New film: Dwindling Forests: Dwindling Futures? Mangroves and Forest Peoples
BANGLADESH Under Threat in the Sundarbans, Bangladesh A new short film, made together with Sundarbans forest communities, highlights how customary use of biodiversity by traditional resource users in the Sundarbans mangrove forest is vital to the conservation and sustainable use of this wetland of international importance, which incorporates a UNESCO World Heritage Site and RAMSAR site. However, traditional knowledge and customary use are being ignored by the Bangladesh Government, and forest peoples are being excluded from decision-making and management of the forest. The film calls for respect and recognition of traditional resource users’ knowledge and practices and a participatory approach to the management of the Sundarbans as a contribution to the implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), as well as respecting forest peoples’ dignity and securing their livelihoods and future. WATCH THE VIDEO

Thoughtless’ palm oil cluster project destroying mangrove forests
wong teckMALAYSIA- The Sabah government’s POIC (Palm Oil Industry Cluster) project in Lahad Datu in the east coast of the state has come under blistering attack from an NGO for what it terms as ‘a blatant disregard’ for the environment and the eco-system in the area. Sabah Environment Protection Association (Sepa) president, Wong Tack, said the billion-ringgit POIC is already destroying the eco-system of ancient mangrove forest areas in Lahad Datu that nature took millions of years to nurture. “POIC is managed by dynamic and educated people, but in its push for the so-called cluster development of palm oil industry, POIC is degrading and destroying the eco-system. “It is reducing the productivity of Sabah’s marine wealth, and hence affecting the livelihood of fishermen around the Darvel Bay area in Lahad Datu. READ MORE

EUROPE

To Save the Planet, Save the Seas
ENGLAND- FOR the many disappointments of the recent climate talks in Copenhagen, there was at least one clear positive outcome, and that was the progress made on a program called Reducing Emissions From Deforestation and Forest Degradation. Under this program, key elements of which were agreed on at Copenhagen, developing countries would be compensated for preserving forests, peat soils, swamps and fields that are efficient absorbers of carbon dioxide, the primary heat-trapping gas linked to global warming. This approach, which takes advantage of the power of nature itself, is an economical way to store large amounts of carbon. But the program is limited in that it includes only those carbon sinks found on land. We now need to look for similar opportunities to curb climate change in the oceans. READ MORE

The Unappreciated Value of Mangroves
NETHERLANDS – A recent flurry of studies and position papers have pointed out that mangroves not only reduce emissions from greenhouse gasses, but also help protect people along the coast from rising sea levels and ever more violent storms. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) explicitly aims to promote activities that both reduce emissions (“mitigation”) and help people adapt to climate change (“adaptation”), but the only nod to mangroves is an obscure provision for rewarding small-scale tree-planting in wetlands. As a result, mangroves are being destroyed at a rate of 1-2% per year, often to make way for luxury resorts, shrimp farms, and other projects offering short-term profits at the expense of the ecosystem on which the activities depend. “We have been extremely unsuccessful in reversing these trends,” says Eveline Trines, co-owner of forestry consultancy Silvestrum. “That is probably because so far there has been a serious lack of incentives.” READ MORE

NORTH AMERICA

Mangrove Ecocide in Quintana Roo
Construction on mangrove habitats drastically alters the level of biodiversity in and around the mangrove ecosystem. Construction on mangrove habitats limits the amount of resources available for species to produce offspring. This has and will have a drastic effect on the future functioning of mangrove ecosystems and the species that rely on them as a refuge, a corridor and a migratory habitat. Articles and news clips following this article are highly important because they represent the dangers associated with the existing and planned indiscriminate constructions that take place on mangrove rich habitats, in particular, the developments of hotels and golf courses located along the east coastline of Quintana Roo, Mexico. READ MORE

Cancún Oceans Day Results Shared
MEXICO -Two recent papers are now available for review online. The Co-Chairs’ Statement emanating from Cancun Oceans Day: at the Sixteenth Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, December 4, 2010, Cancún, Mexico LINK HERE ans A Summary Report of the Oceans Day at Cancún Published by the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) in collaboration with the Global Forum on Oceans, Coasts and Islands LINK HERE

In Cancun, everyone’s talking about Blue Carbon
Mexico- The term Blue Carbon seems to be gaining traction outside of the world of science and environmental economics. Or – at the very least – its gaining traction in Cancun. Numerous groups have strategically launched new reports regarding the capture, conservation, and capitalization of carbon on our coasts. Just in time for the climate menagerie in Mexico: COP16. World Bank, ICUN, the Nicholas Institute at Duke University, and a new Blue Climate Coalition are laying material on the table — and the web. You can access the new Blue Carbon policy brief from Duke and read about the Blue Climate Coalition here. The World Bank and IUCN put our their own report on building mitigation and adaptation for carbon-rich coasts. If you were able to read Dan Laffoly’s (IUCN) eloquent New York Times Op-Ed last January, this report provides some great follow-up and substance. READ MORE

CancunCan’t Last as Long as Mangroves, Can Humanity Outlive Cancun?
MEXICO- Cancun’s unsustainable beaches won’t last as long as the mangrove forests that began being destroyed here when this little strip of paradise was first paved over 40 years ago. Last year, 80 million dollars worth of sand was dredged out from under octopuses to make up for losses caused by hurricanes that left waves lapping against hotel foundations. For the time being, this relatively small investment preserves billions in revenue from tourism, but, taking the long view, it’s difficult to justify the “beach rescues.” Already, 8 percent of the new sand has been swept away – even without any major storms. With the global climate crisis increasing the frequency and impact of extreme weather events, it is only a matter of time before artificial preservation of the beaches is no longer cost-effective. Inevitably, the sea levels will rise and turn Cancun into Atlantis. READ MORE

Blue Carbon Message Presented
USA – Blue Climate Coalition letters, which advance the blue works and blue carbon concepts – basically healthy coasts and oceans as critical economic infrastructure and as part of the solution to climate change were recently delivered to:

The White House : aimed to keep interest alive for blue carbon and offer a range of policy options to the Executive Branch, regarding both domestic and foreign policy.
The Global Environment Facility : aimed to stir interest in blue carbon with this major international climate change funding body.
Senators Kerry and Lieberman : Coalition thank you letters for their action of including options for blue carbon in US climate change legislation (American Power Act, discussion draft). READ MORE

Lack of biodiversity can contribute to spread of disease, say scientists
USA- The loss of biodiversity in ecosystems ranging from marine coral reefs to terrestrial forests can increase the transmission of infectious diseases in humans, other animals and plants, according to a new scientific analysis published in the journal Nature. This connection between two developing crises – emerging novel diseases and unprecedented declines in biodiversity – has long been suspected, but has been difficult to quantify, scientists say. “In theory, the loss of biodiversity could increase or decrease transmission of disease,” said Anna Jolles, a disease ecology specialist in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Oregon State University and one of the authors of the study. “Certainly, having naturally high biodiversity should increase the potential pool of sources for new pathogens. But the evidence suggests that in most cases, biodiversity loss actually ramps up transmission of disease. Now we need to find out why.” READ MORE

US Shrimp Imports Rise in October
USA- U.S. shrimp imports rebounded in October, topping 135 million pounds, up 1.6 percent from October 2009, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported. It’s been an up-and-down year for U.S. shrimp imports, which had increased in each of the last three months (June, July and August) until slipping in September. Prior to June, they had dropped in 10 of the last 11 months. But now U.S. shrimp imports are on track to this year exceed 2009’s total of 1.21 billion pounds, albeit slightly. Through October, they were up 0.4 percent to nearly 988 million pounds. READ MORE

SOUTH PACIFIC

Nutrient Enrichment Increases Mortality of Mangroves
AUSTRALIA– Researchers have found that nutrient enrichment of the coastal zone places intense pressure on marine communities. Previous studies have shown that growth of intertidal mangrove forests increase with enhanced nutrient availability. However, nutrient enrichment favors growth of shoots relative to roots, thus enhancing growth rates but increasing vulnerability to environmental stresses. Two such stresses are: high salinity and low humidity, both of which require greater investment in roots to meet the demands for water by the shoots. In this study, enhanced mortality of experimentally enriched mangroves was shown to be related at sites where high sediment salinity was coincident with low rainfall and low humidity. Thus the benefits of increased mangrove growth in response to coastal eutrophication is offset by the costs of decreased resilience due to mortality during drought, with mortality increasing with soil water salinity along climatic gradients. READ MORE

FURTHER REVIEW – MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATIONS

Editors Note – Some nice presentations were submitted for inclusion to our newsletter, but as yet, we don’t have the capability to embed them in the newsletter. Please click on the links below for some very informational presentations.

CHEAP SHRIMP HIDDEN COST VIEW HERE

THE HIGH ENVIRONMENTAL COST OF GLOBAL SHRIMP VIEW HERE

~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS

If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com
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The MAP News, 252nd Ed., 11 December 2010

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Dear Friends,
This is the 252nd Edition of the Mangrove Action Project News, December 11, 2010.

For the Mangroves,
Alfredo Quarto
Mangrove Action Project

MAP’s Mission

Partnering with mangrove forest communities, grassroots NGOs, researchers and local governments to conserve and restore mangrove forests and related coastal ecosystems, while promoting community-based, sustainable management of coastal resources.

DONATE TO MAP

MAP depends on your support in order to produce this e-bulletin and all that we do. Please visit our website and consider donating to MAP today. It is easy to give a one-time donation, or to set up monthly recurring donations via PayPal or Network for Good!

SHRIMP LESS, THINK MORE campaign has changed it’s name to QUESTION YOUR SHRIMP:

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog.
Join MAP on Facebook
Sign the Consumer’s Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

Action Alerts:

Funding limitations threaten MAP’s programs
Let’s join together now to Save the Mangroves! Donate $25 or more to receive a beautiful Children’s Mangrove Art Calendar for 2011! Please also consider ordering MAP’s beautiful calendars today, they make excellent gifts for the upcoming new year, while helping a great cause in the process! READ MORE

Serious Threats to the Sea Turtles
Take Action to Protect India’s Ancient Olive Ridley Population
1) Click here to add your name to a petition opposing the POSCO port in Orissa.
2) Click here to donate to support STRP’s international efforts to protect sea turtles.

Rethinking Plastics Campaign
We’re addicted to plastic, especially plastic bags. If you are like 95% of US shoppers, whenever you purchase anything, it ends up in a plastic bag. Join the Campaign. Sign up for our Plastics Newsletter ALSO View Video

Mangrove Ecology, Management and Restoration Workshop
Registration of the 2011 “Mangrove Ecology, Management and Restoration Workshop” will close on Jan 1, 2011. Read More.

Palm oil for power station in Hawaii threatens forests and communities
Hawaii’s largest electricity company, HECO, could soon become one of the largest US importers of palm oil. They have been given permission to burn 2.56 million gallons of palm oil in two large power stations for a ‘test phase’ – and they want to burn far more after that. HECO’s so-called ‘clean energy’ will mean more deforestation and land-grabbing in South-east Asia and West Africa, and more climate change. Please go to http://www.rainforest-rescue.org and write to policy makers in Hawaii, requesting that they withdraw permission for HECO to burn palm oil or other agrofuels. Please let friends and family know about this alert.

Help stop environmentally disastrous road route and bridge project in Indonesia’s Balikpapan Bay.
WRITE TO LEADERS
VIEW SAMPLE LETTER
READ MORE

Protect India’s Coastline – Stop the Ports SIGN THE PETITION

World Atlas of Mangroves donates 10% of purchase price to Mangrove Action Project LEARN MORE

Help with Kenya Ports Write to leaders

Don’t Let Experimental Genetically Engineered Salmon Reach Your Plate
Take action to keep genetically engineered salmon out of the U.S.CLICK HERE

Urgent Appeal to all wildlife and nature protection organizations in the world
Stop Saudi destruction of mangroves and tideflats. WRITE TO OFFICIALS

Borneo: Stop the company from stealing our forests!
The indigenous people of Western Kalimantan(Borneo) are fighting against deforestation for four years. The Indonesian government as well as the company clearing their forest have ignored the demands of the Dayak communities so far. Now, they need international support. Please help by TAKING ACTION NOW

Action Alert: Papua New Guinea – Don’t Dump Poisons into the Sea!
The government of Papua New Guinea doesn’t want to hear from us. It has authorized a Chinese mining company to dump toxic waste into the sea, and it is determined to stifle dissent from every quarter.

JAMAICA’S FONT HILL
Save Font Hill Nature Preserve from development. Please Sign our Petition

MAP ISSUES

Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide
By Martin A. Keeley, Education Director, Mangrove Action Project
Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT

Education In The Mangroves
Six minute video features discussion of Mangrove Action Project’s Mangrove Curriculum VIEW THE VIDEO

FEATURED SECTION

NASA images reveal disappearing mangroves worldwide
seasia_tm5_mangroves_lrg.568In August NASA and the US Geological Survey released the first-ever satellite analysis of the world’s mangrove ecosystems. What they found was dire: mangroves covered 12.3% less area than previously estimated. Now, NASA has released images of the world’s mangrove ecosystems (see below), which currently cover 137,760 square kilometers. Yet this number keeps shrinking: mangroves are vanishing rapidly due to rising sea levels, deforestation for coastal developments, agriculture and aquaculture. Among the world’s most important ecosystems, mangroves are tropical saline-adapted forests that survive in tropical coastlines. These forests serve as nurseries for a variety marine fish, underpinning global fisheries and providing additional food for coastal communities. READ MORE

ASIA

Govt targets 75 pct increase in shrimp production
INDONESIA- Karangasem, Bali Province(ANTARA News) – The marine and fishery affairs ministry has set itself the target of increasing national shrimp production in the 2010-2014 period by 74-75 percent or from 400,000 tons to 699,000 tons. “Shrimp aquaculture business opportunities are still wide open in Indonesia and there are also great land and aquaculture technology potentials among the public,” Marine and Fishery Affairs Minister Fadel Muhammad said. The targeted 699,000 tons would consist of 500,000 tons of vannamei shrimp and 199,000 tons of tiger shrimp. To achieve the target, the ministry estimated that the country would need 43.22 million tons of shrimp fry. Indonesia has 1.2 million hectares of potential pond areas, and 613,000 hectares of them are being exploited, according to the minister. READ MORE

Illegal breeding of shrimp rises in Andhra Pradesh
INDIA- India’s introduction of the exotic South American white shrimp variety, vannamei, early this year has led to widespread illegal cultivation and posed the threat of disease across shrimp farms in Andhra Pradesh. Production from the 1,200ha approved for cultivation is estimated to be around 20,000 tonnes in the current fiscal, but already more than 30,000 tonnes has been exported, indicating the extent of illegal cultivation, says Leena Nair, chairperson of the Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA), a government trade promotion body. Farmers are illegally breeding the stock in farms and distributing it across Andhra Pradesh, where there is large-scale aquaculture farming, she said. READ MORE

Extreme weather erodes JavaSea’s maritime prospects
INDONESIA- Extreme weather has seen catches decline and sea accidents increase in the Java Sea, a report says. The People’s Coalition for Fisheries Justice (Kiara) in its latest report said extreme weather had reduced the number of times the average traditional fisherman went to sea to 160 to 180 times per year from previously 240 to 300 times per year, which equals to a 50 to 70 percent decrease. “Many fishermen have earned only Rp 40,000 [US$4.44] after fishing the entire day. Some even go home with nothing,” said the coalition’s secretary-general, Riza Damanik, at the launch of a report titled Climate Change and Anthropogenic Impacts in the Java Sea. The research has also observed traditional fishermen’s activities in coastal areas in other areas in the country, including Sibolga on the western coast of Sumatra, Langkat and Serdang Bedagai in North Sumatra, Tarakan in northern East Kalimantan and Manado Bay in North Sulawesi. READ MORE

EUROPE

Ocean acidification may threaten food security: U.N.
Commercial fishermen and other mariners form the word "SOS" in HomerNETHERLANDS – Acidification of the seas linked to climate change could threaten fisheries production and is already causing the fastest shift in ocean chemistry in 65 million years, a U.N. study showed. Production of shellfish, such as mussels, shrimp or lobsters, could be most at risk since they will find it harder to build protective shells, according to the report issued on the sidelines of U.N. climate talks in Mexico. It could also damage coral reefs, vital as nurseries for many commercial fish stocks. “Ocean acidification is yet another red flag being raised, carrying planetary health warnings about the uncontrolled growth in greenhouse gas emissions,” said Achim Steiner, head of the U.N. Environment Programme (UNEP). READ MORE

NORTH AMERICA

Environmental NGO questions seafood eco-labels
FWWreportUSA- Seafood eco-labels are not adequate indicators of sustainable seafood choices for consumers, restaurants or retailers, a Washington, D.C., environmental advocacy group declared. Food & Water Watch (F&WW) criticized leading seafood eco-labels such as the Marine Stewardship Council, Global Aquaculture Alliance and Friend of the Sea with its guide, “De-Coding Seafood Eco-Labels: Why We Need Public Standards.” Eco-labels inadequately regard environmental standards, social responsibility and community relations, labor regulations, international law and transparency, F&WW said. “People often think that if they buy seafood with an eco-label, it’s automatically a good choice,” said F&WW Executive Director Wenonah Hauter. “Unfortunately, these certifications don’t assure that the product consumers are getting is actually eco-friendly.” READ MORE

Cancun’s vanishing mangroves hold climate promise
MEXICO– Cancun’s famous beach resort, which will next week host international climate change talks, was itself born from the destruction of a potent resource to fight global warming. Thick mangrove forests lined the canals and waterways here before developers dredged the land to make way for the upscale hotels that now draw several million tourists every year. In the 40 years since Cancun was founded, countless acres of mangrove forests up and down Mexico’s Caribbean Coast have been lost — and the destruction continues. Now many scientists say that mangrove forests can help slow climate change, and are desperate to save them. READ MORE

From mangroves to cloud forests, Venezuelan scientists look to catalogue threatened ecosystems
VENEZUELA- From mangrove swamps in Venezuela to lowland forests in Indonesia, entire communities of plants and animals are under threat. Now scientists are figuring out how to catalogue and map the world’s most threatened ecosystems, just like their familiar lists of endangered species. Some experts say drawing up a global “Red List” of vanishing ecosystems would help them spot looming crises caused by climate change, cutting of forests and many other problems. The list also would sharpen the focus on areas that should be handled as conservation priorities. “Declaring the mangrove ecosystem threatened would be very useful for conservation,” Sanchez said. “People stand up to defend dolphins. People stand up to defend turtles. But I’ve never seen them defend the mangrove forest with the same vehemence. READ MORE

The Allure – and Elusiveness – of Mangroves as Carbon Sinks
USA- It’s hard to imagine a more valuable ecosystem than a mangrove forest. These rugged coastal woods protect the shoreline from both sudden storms and gradual erosion; they provide shelter for young fish, breeding grounds for shrimp, and wood for local villagers – all of which are the fruits of clearly delineable ecosystem services, each which has a clear line to who benefits the most. This should, in theory, make it easy to entice those who benefit into paying for the ecosystem services that mangroves generate. Tourism operators and fishers, for example, could both pay mangrove guardians for the upkeep of coral reefs; fishers could pay for the nurturing of their prey; and anyone along the shore could pay to keep the sea at bay and prevent their houses from falling into the sea. There’s just one catch: in most developing countries, the people who benefit the most from mangroves don’t have the money to make payments for ecosystem services. This leaves the carbon market as the most promising way to fund the rescue and restoration of mangrove forests, with payments from fishers who export and tourists who visit trailing far behind. READ MORE

MORE READING

This article on USGS investigations of global mangrove resource include some useful statements, statistics and downloadable map images. Direct application for MAP’s work on role of mangroves globally – e.g. in productivity, coastal protection, climate change adaptation. Scarce Forests

~ WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS

If you’d like to have the last word on this or any other mangrove related topic, please send us your submission for upcoming newsletters. We’ll choose one per issue to have “the last word”. While we can’t promise to publish everyone’s letter, we do encourage anyone to post comments on our Blog at www. mangroveactionproject.blogspot.com
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